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Did the removal of the indication of nocturnal enuresis for intranasal desmopressin change prescribing practice?
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 Jan; 20(1):105-9.PD

Abstract

PURPOSE

The indication for the treatment of primary nocturnal enuresis was removed from all intranasal preparations of desmopressin in May 2007. Objective of this study was to examine whether and how fast this regulatory decision changed prescribing in affected children.

METHODS

We analyzed claims data of the Gmünder ErsatzKasse (GEK) over the years 2004-2008. All children and adolescents aged 0-18 years who received at least one out-patient diagnosis of urinary incontinence in the corresponding years were included. Our outcome of interest was the proportion of oral desmopressin and its change over time.

RESULTS

A total of 6308 to 7207 children with a mean age of about 8 years were included annually (62-63% were male) and 14 746 packages of desmopressin were analysed (49.9% intranasal; 50.1% oral; 0.01% parenteral preparations). The proportion of patients using desmopressin decreased slightly from 13.9% in 2004 to 12.6% in 2008 (p for trend = 0.0131). Between January 2004 (39.1%) and December 2006 (41.3%), the proportion of oral forms was nearly constant and doubled after that within a few months to about 80%.

CONCLUSIONS

Immediately after the removal of the indication for intranasal desmopressin, an increased prescribing of tablet forms in affected children was found in Germany.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Social Policy Research, Division Health Economics, Health Policy and Outcomes Research, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany. hoffmann@zes.uni-bremen.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21182158

Citation

Hoffmann, Falk, et al. "Did the Removal of the Indication of Nocturnal Enuresis for Intranasal Desmopressin Change Prescribing Practice?" Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, vol. 20, no. 1, 2011, pp. 105-9.
Hoffmann F, Glaeske G, Steuber C. Did the removal of the indication of nocturnal enuresis for intranasal desmopressin change prescribing practice? Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011;20(1):105-9.
Hoffmann, F., Glaeske, G., & Steuber, C. (2011). Did the removal of the indication of nocturnal enuresis for intranasal desmopressin change prescribing practice? Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, 20(1), 105-9. https://doi.org/10.1002/pds.2070
Hoffmann F, Glaeske G, Steuber C. Did the Removal of the Indication of Nocturnal Enuresis for Intranasal Desmopressin Change Prescribing Practice. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011;20(1):105-9. PubMed PMID: 21182158.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Did the removal of the indication of nocturnal enuresis for intranasal desmopressin change prescribing practice? AU - Hoffmann,Falk, AU - Glaeske,Gerd, AU - Steuber,Christian, Y1 - 2010/11/11/ PY - 2010/07/28/received PY - 2010/09/27/revised PY - 2010/09/30/accepted PY - 2010/12/25/entrez PY - 2010/12/25/pubmed PY - 2011/7/16/medline SP - 105 EP - 9 JF - Pharmacoepidemiology and drug safety JO - Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: The indication for the treatment of primary nocturnal enuresis was removed from all intranasal preparations of desmopressin in May 2007. Objective of this study was to examine whether and how fast this regulatory decision changed prescribing in affected children. METHODS: We analyzed claims data of the Gmünder ErsatzKasse (GEK) over the years 2004-2008. All children and adolescents aged 0-18 years who received at least one out-patient diagnosis of urinary incontinence in the corresponding years were included. Our outcome of interest was the proportion of oral desmopressin and its change over time. RESULTS: A total of 6308 to 7207 children with a mean age of about 8 years were included annually (62-63% were male) and 14 746 packages of desmopressin were analysed (49.9% intranasal; 50.1% oral; 0.01% parenteral preparations). The proportion of patients using desmopressin decreased slightly from 13.9% in 2004 to 12.6% in 2008 (p for trend = 0.0131). Between January 2004 (39.1%) and December 2006 (41.3%), the proportion of oral forms was nearly constant and doubled after that within a few months to about 80%. CONCLUSIONS: Immediately after the removal of the indication for intranasal desmopressin, an increased prescribing of tablet forms in affected children was found in Germany. SN - 1099-1557 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21182158/Did_the_removal_of_the_indication_of_nocturnal_enuresis_for_intranasal_desmopressin_change_prescribing_practice L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/pds.2070 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -