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Effects of HUD-supported lead hazard control interventions in housing on children's blood lead.
Environ Res. 2011 Feb; 111(2):301-11.ER

Abstract

The Evaluation of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Grant Program studied the effectiveness of the housing intervention performed in reducing the blood lead of children at four post-intervention times (6-months, 1-year, 2-years, and 3-years). A repeat measures analysis showed that blood lead levels declined up to three-years post-intervention. The results at each successive collection time were significantly lower than at the previous post-intervention time except for the difference between the levels at two and three years. At two-years post-intervention, geometric mean blood lead levels were approximately 37% lower than at pre-intervention. Children with pre-intervention blood lead levels as low as 10 μg/dL experienced substantial declines in blood lead levels. Previous studies have found substantial improvements only if a child's pre-intervention blood lead level was above 20 μg/dL. Individual interior lead hazard control treatments as grouped by Interior Strategy were not a significant predictor of post-intervention blood lead levels. However, children living in dwellings where exterior lead hazard control interventions were done had lower blood lead levels at one-year post-intervention than those living in dwellings without the exterior interventions (all other factors being equal), but those differences were only significant when the mean exterior paint lead loading at pre-intervention was about the 90th percentile (7.0mg/cm(2)). This observation suggests that exterior lead hazard control can be an important component of a lead hazard control plan. Children who were six to eleven months of age at pre-intervention had a significant increase in blood lead at one-year post-intervention, probably due to other exposures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA. clarkcs@ucmail.uc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21183164

Citation

Clark, Scott, et al. "Effects of HUD-supported Lead Hazard Control Interventions in Housing On Children's Blood Lead." Environmental Research, vol. 111, no. 2, 2011, pp. 301-11.
Clark S, Galke W, Succop P, et al. Effects of HUD-supported lead hazard control interventions in housing on children's blood lead. Environ Res. 2011;111(2):301-11.
Clark, S., Galke, W., Succop, P., Grote, J., McLaine, P., Wilson, J., Dixon, S., Menrath, W., Roda, S., Chen, M., Bornschein, R., & Jacobs, D. (2011). Effects of HUD-supported lead hazard control interventions in housing on children's blood lead. Environmental Research, 111(2), 301-11. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2010.11.003
Clark S, et al. Effects of HUD-supported Lead Hazard Control Interventions in Housing On Children's Blood Lead. Environ Res. 2011;111(2):301-11. PubMed PMID: 21183164.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of HUD-supported lead hazard control interventions in housing on children's blood lead. AU - Clark,Scott, AU - Galke,Warren, AU - Succop,Paul, AU - Grote,Joann, AU - McLaine,Pat, AU - Wilson,Jonathan, AU - Dixon,Sherry, AU - Menrath,William, AU - Roda,Sandy, AU - Chen,Mei, AU - Bornschein,Robert, AU - Jacobs,David, Y1 - 2010/12/22/ PY - 2010/03/18/received PY - 2010/11/01/revised PY - 2010/11/04/accepted PY - 2010/12/25/entrez PY - 2010/12/25/pubmed PY - 2011/3/8/medline SP - 301 EP - 11 JF - Environmental research JO - Environ Res VL - 111 IS - 2 N2 - The Evaluation of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Grant Program studied the effectiveness of the housing intervention performed in reducing the blood lead of children at four post-intervention times (6-months, 1-year, 2-years, and 3-years). A repeat measures analysis showed that blood lead levels declined up to three-years post-intervention. The results at each successive collection time were significantly lower than at the previous post-intervention time except for the difference between the levels at two and three years. At two-years post-intervention, geometric mean blood lead levels were approximately 37% lower than at pre-intervention. Children with pre-intervention blood lead levels as low as 10 μg/dL experienced substantial declines in blood lead levels. Previous studies have found substantial improvements only if a child's pre-intervention blood lead level was above 20 μg/dL. Individual interior lead hazard control treatments as grouped by Interior Strategy were not a significant predictor of post-intervention blood lead levels. However, children living in dwellings where exterior lead hazard control interventions were done had lower blood lead levels at one-year post-intervention than those living in dwellings without the exterior interventions (all other factors being equal), but those differences were only significant when the mean exterior paint lead loading at pre-intervention was about the 90th percentile (7.0mg/cm(2)). This observation suggests that exterior lead hazard control can be an important component of a lead hazard control plan. Children who were six to eleven months of age at pre-intervention had a significant increase in blood lead at one-year post-intervention, probably due to other exposures. SN - 1096-0953 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21183164/Effects_of_HUD_supported_lead_hazard_control_interventions_in_housing_on_children's_blood_lead_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0013-9351(10)00184-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -