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Management of menopausal symptoms in breast cancer patients.
Maturitas 2011; 68(2):148-54M

Abstract

In breast cancer patients, menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, urogenital problems, musculoskeletal symptoms and cognitive dysfunction are common, regardless of age at diagnosis. They affect quality of life and systemic therapy will worsen this. Endocrine and/or chemotherapy may induce temporary or permanent ovarian failure and can exacerbate these symptoms. Hormone therapy (HT) has been studied in breast cancer survivors, but safety has been questioned. The HABITS trial investigating estrogen-based HT, as well as the LIBERATE trial investigating tibolone, found a reduction in disease-free survival for those treated. Alternative strategies are needed, as menopause symptoms may reduce compliance with breast cancer treatments. This article reviews recently published strategies to tackle menopausal problems in breast cancer patients. Antidepressants may help with hot flashes. Acupuncture and hypnosis can also be used but the evidence is conflicting. For urogenital problems vaginal moisturizers or topical estrogens can be employed. A musculoskeletal syndrome induced by aromatase inhibitors (AIs) is frequently encountered and currently there are no effective treatment strategies. Bisphosphonates reduce AI-induced bone resorption and can also increase disease-free and overall survival. Standard-dose endocrine and chemotherapy are associated with a decline in cognitive function.

Authors+Show Affiliations

German Breast Group, GBG Forschungs GmbH, Neu-Isenburg, Germany. Sibylle.loibl@germanbreastgroup.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21185135

Citation

Loibl, S, et al. "Management of Menopausal Symptoms in Breast Cancer Patients." Maturitas, vol. 68, no. 2, 2011, pp. 148-54.
Loibl S, Lintermans A, Dieudonné AS, et al. Management of menopausal symptoms in breast cancer patients. Maturitas. 2011;68(2):148-54.
Loibl, S., Lintermans, A., Dieudonné, A. S., & Neven, P. (2011). Management of menopausal symptoms in breast cancer patients. Maturitas, 68(2), pp. 148-54. doi:10.1016/j.maturitas.2010.11.013.
Loibl S, et al. Management of Menopausal Symptoms in Breast Cancer Patients. Maturitas. 2011;68(2):148-54. PubMed PMID: 21185135.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Management of menopausal symptoms in breast cancer patients. AU - Loibl,S, AU - Lintermans,A, AU - Dieudonné,A S, AU - Neven,P, Y1 - 2010/12/23/ PY - 2010/09/22/received PY - 2010/11/08/revised PY - 2010/11/09/accepted PY - 2010/12/28/entrez PY - 2010/12/28/pubmed PY - 2011/4/27/medline SP - 148 EP - 54 JF - Maturitas JO - Maturitas VL - 68 IS - 2 N2 - In breast cancer patients, menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, urogenital problems, musculoskeletal symptoms and cognitive dysfunction are common, regardless of age at diagnosis. They affect quality of life and systemic therapy will worsen this. Endocrine and/or chemotherapy may induce temporary or permanent ovarian failure and can exacerbate these symptoms. Hormone therapy (HT) has been studied in breast cancer survivors, but safety has been questioned. The HABITS trial investigating estrogen-based HT, as well as the LIBERATE trial investigating tibolone, found a reduction in disease-free survival for those treated. Alternative strategies are needed, as menopause symptoms may reduce compliance with breast cancer treatments. This article reviews recently published strategies to tackle menopausal problems in breast cancer patients. Antidepressants may help with hot flashes. Acupuncture and hypnosis can also be used but the evidence is conflicting. For urogenital problems vaginal moisturizers or topical estrogens can be employed. A musculoskeletal syndrome induced by aromatase inhibitors (AIs) is frequently encountered and currently there are no effective treatment strategies. Bisphosphonates reduce AI-induced bone resorption and can also increase disease-free and overall survival. Standard-dose endocrine and chemotherapy are associated with a decline in cognitive function. SN - 1873-4111 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21185135/Management_of_menopausal_symptoms_in_breast_cancer_patients_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-5122(10)00424-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -