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Effects of alcohol withdrawal on cardiovascular system.

Abstract

Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) develops after cessation of alcohol intake in alcoholic patients characterizing psychiatric symptoms and changes in autonomous nervous systems. We studied cardiovascular changes during different phases of AWS (1, 2, 3 and 10 days after admission for detoxification; n=34) and compared them with those in early recovery (at least 1 month of abstinence; n=30). The results study showed that cardiovascular system underwent significant changes during AWS characterizing the decrease of heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and total peripheral resistance. Stroke index was lower during AWS than in early recovery. As the decreased stroke index was compensated by increased heart rate, cardiac index did not differ during AWS from that in early recovery. Increased functioning of noradrenaline (along with other central and peripheral regulating mechanisms) may be an important factor associated with cardiovascular changes in AWS. Normalization of this function after AWS leads to returning of cardiovascular parameters to baseline levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

BioMag Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland. Seppo.Kahkonen@helsinki.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21185902

Citation

Kähkönen, Seppo, et al. "Effects of Alcohol Withdrawal On Cardiovascular System." Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, vol. 35, no. 2, 2011, pp. 550-3.
Kähkönen S, Zvartau E, Lipsanen J, et al. Effects of alcohol withdrawal on cardiovascular system. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2011;35(2):550-3.
Kähkönen, S., Zvartau, E., Lipsanen, J., & Bondarenko, B. (2011). Effects of alcohol withdrawal on cardiovascular system. Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 35(2), pp. 550-3. doi:10.1016/j.pnpbp.2010.12.015.
Kähkönen S, et al. Effects of Alcohol Withdrawal On Cardiovascular System. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2011 Mar 30;35(2):550-3. PubMed PMID: 21185902.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of alcohol withdrawal on cardiovascular system. AU - Kähkönen,Seppo, AU - Zvartau,Edwin, AU - Lipsanen,Jari, AU - Bondarenko,Boris, Y1 - 2010/12/23/ PY - 2010/11/04/received PY - 2010/12/16/revised PY - 2010/12/16/accepted PY - 2010/12/28/entrez PY - 2010/12/28/pubmed PY - 2011/12/13/medline SP - 550 EP - 3 JF - Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry JO - Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatry VL - 35 IS - 2 N2 - Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) develops after cessation of alcohol intake in alcoholic patients characterizing psychiatric symptoms and changes in autonomous nervous systems. We studied cardiovascular changes during different phases of AWS (1, 2, 3 and 10 days after admission for detoxification; n=34) and compared them with those in early recovery (at least 1 month of abstinence; n=30). The results study showed that cardiovascular system underwent significant changes during AWS characterizing the decrease of heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and total peripheral resistance. Stroke index was lower during AWS than in early recovery. As the decreased stroke index was compensated by increased heart rate, cardiac index did not differ during AWS from that in early recovery. Increased functioning of noradrenaline (along with other central and peripheral regulating mechanisms) may be an important factor associated with cardiovascular changes in AWS. Normalization of this function after AWS leads to returning of cardiovascular parameters to baseline levels. SN - 1878-4216 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21185902/Effects_of_alcohol_withdrawal_on_cardiovascular_system_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0278-5846(10)00509-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -