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Low gestational weight gain improves infant and maternal pregnancy outcomes in overweight and obese Korean women with gestational diabetes mellitus.
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2011 Oct; 27(10):775-81.GE

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of the study was to retrospectively assess what was the optimal gestational weight gain to have better maternal and neonatal outcomes in overweight and obese Korean women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who maintained normoglycemia throughout pregnancy by dietary modification, exercise, and/or insulin treatment.

STUDY DESIGN

We performed a hospital-based study of 215 GDM women with prepregnancy BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2). Body weight, glucose homeostasis, lipid profiles, insulin treatment, and maternal outcomes were collected as predictors of neonatal birth weight. We divided the subjects into three groups according to modified Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines for weight gain during pregnancy: inadequate (n = 42), normal (n = 96), and excessive (n = 77) groups.

RESULTS

Excessive weight gain resulted in increased macrosomia, HbA(1c) at delivery, and postprandial blood glucose levels, but fasting blood glucose levels were not significantly different among the groups. The inadequate weight gain group (2.4 kg weight gain during pregnancy) had better neonatal outcomes and better maternal glycemic control with fewer requiring insulin treatment.

CONCLUSION

Minimal weight gain, well below IOM recommendations, and tight control of blood glucose levels during pregnancy with proper medical management and dietary modification may eliminate most of the adverse pregnancy outcomes experienced by obese GDM Asian women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Cheil General Hospital & Women's Healthcare Center, Seoul, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21190417

Citation

Park, Jeong Eun, et al. "Low Gestational Weight Gain Improves Infant and Maternal Pregnancy Outcomes in Overweight and Obese Korean Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus." Gynecological Endocrinology : the Official Journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology, vol. 27, no. 10, 2011, pp. 775-81.
Park JE, Park S, Daily JW, et al. Low gestational weight gain improves infant and maternal pregnancy outcomes in overweight and obese Korean women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Gynecol Endocrinol. 2011;27(10):775-81.
Park, J. E., Park, S., Daily, J. W., & Kim, S. H. (2011). Low gestational weight gain improves infant and maternal pregnancy outcomes in overweight and obese Korean women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Gynecological Endocrinology : the Official Journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology, 27(10), 775-81. https://doi.org/10.3109/09513590.2010.540597
Park JE, et al. Low Gestational Weight Gain Improves Infant and Maternal Pregnancy Outcomes in Overweight and Obese Korean Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. Gynecol Endocrinol. 2011;27(10):775-81. PubMed PMID: 21190417.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low gestational weight gain improves infant and maternal pregnancy outcomes in overweight and obese Korean women with gestational diabetes mellitus. AU - Park,Jeong Eun, AU - Park,Sunmin, AU - Daily,James W, AU - Kim,Sung-Hoon, Y1 - 2010/12/29/ PY - 2010/12/31/entrez PY - 2010/12/31/pubmed PY - 2012/3/1/medline SP - 775 EP - 81 JF - Gynecological endocrinology : the official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology JO - Gynecol. Endocrinol. VL - 27 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to retrospectively assess what was the optimal gestational weight gain to have better maternal and neonatal outcomes in overweight and obese Korean women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who maintained normoglycemia throughout pregnancy by dietary modification, exercise, and/or insulin treatment. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a hospital-based study of 215 GDM women with prepregnancy BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2). Body weight, glucose homeostasis, lipid profiles, insulin treatment, and maternal outcomes were collected as predictors of neonatal birth weight. We divided the subjects into three groups according to modified Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines for weight gain during pregnancy: inadequate (n = 42), normal (n = 96), and excessive (n = 77) groups. RESULTS: Excessive weight gain resulted in increased macrosomia, HbA(1c) at delivery, and postprandial blood glucose levels, but fasting blood glucose levels were not significantly different among the groups. The inadequate weight gain group (2.4 kg weight gain during pregnancy) had better neonatal outcomes and better maternal glycemic control with fewer requiring insulin treatment. CONCLUSION: Minimal weight gain, well below IOM recommendations, and tight control of blood glucose levels during pregnancy with proper medical management and dietary modification may eliminate most of the adverse pregnancy outcomes experienced by obese GDM Asian women. SN - 1473-0766 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21190417/Low_gestational_weight_gain_improves_infant_and_maternal_pregnancy_outcomes_in_overweight_and_obese_Korean_women_with_gestational_diabetes_mellitus_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/09513590.2010.540597 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -