Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Prepregnancy body mass index as an independent risk factor for pregnancy-induced hypertension.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) 2011; 20(1):67-72JW

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) plays a major role in the perinatal outcome for mother and neonate. With the rising prevalence of obesity, the role of prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) as an independent risk factor for PIH and a target for preconception care is important to explore.

METHODS

We completed a retrospective cohort study of 16,582 women who received obstetrical care at a regional medical center and delivered a singleton pregnancy between 2003 and 2006. Clinical data were derived from the electronic medical record. Logistic regression was used to explore the association of demographic characteristics and medical risk factors with the outcome of PIH.

RESULTS

Diagnoses of chronic hypertension, prepregnancy diabetes, and gestational diabetes were more likely in women with increasing prepregnancy maternal BMI (p < 0.0001). The odds of PIH also increased with BMI, ranging from an odds ratio (OR) of 1.99 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.73-2.31) for overweight women through OR 4.26 (95% CI 3.37-5.38) for those with a BMI of ≥40 kg/m(2). Other risk factors for PIH included chronic hypertension (OR 6.57, 95% CI 5.43-7.95), nulliparity (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.69-2.12), prepregnancy diabetes (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.33-3.17), and gestational diabetes (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04-1.58). The presence of chronic hypertension modified the association between obesity and PIH; for women with chronic hypertension, obesity was not associated with PIH (adjusted OR [aOR] 1.39, 95% CI 0.77-2.50 for BMI 30-34.9; aOR 0.98, 95% CI 0.52-1.87 for BMI 35-39.9; and aOR 1.33, 95% CI 0.73-2.43 for BMI ≥40 kg/m(2)) compared with women with a BMI in the normal range.

CONCLUSIONS

The risk of PIH rises with maternal prepregnancy BMI independent of other obesity-associated comorbidity. Women with chronic hypertension carry the greatest risk of PIH but incur no obesity-associated increase in risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Christiana Care Health Services, Newark, DE 19718, USA. dehrenthal@christianacare.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21194273

Citation

Ehrenthal, Deborah B., et al. "Prepregnancy Body Mass Index as an Independent Risk Factor for Pregnancy-induced Hypertension." Journal of Women's Health (2002), vol. 20, no. 1, 2011, pp. 67-72.
Ehrenthal DB, Jurkovitz C, Hoffman M, et al. Prepregnancy body mass index as an independent risk factor for pregnancy-induced hypertension. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2011;20(1):67-72.
Ehrenthal, D. B., Jurkovitz, C., Hoffman, M., Jiang, X., & Weintraub, W. S. (2011). Prepregnancy body mass index as an independent risk factor for pregnancy-induced hypertension. Journal of Women's Health (2002), 20(1), pp. 67-72. doi:10.1089/jwh.2010.1970.
Ehrenthal DB, et al. Prepregnancy Body Mass Index as an Independent Risk Factor for Pregnancy-induced Hypertension. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2011;20(1):67-72. PubMed PMID: 21194273.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prepregnancy body mass index as an independent risk factor for pregnancy-induced hypertension. AU - Ehrenthal,Deborah B, AU - Jurkovitz,Claudine, AU - Hoffman,Matthew, AU - Jiang,Xiaozhang, AU - Weintraub,William S, Y1 - 2010/12/31/ PY - 2011/1/4/entrez PY - 2011/1/5/pubmed PY - 2011/9/3/medline SP - 67 EP - 72 JF - Journal of women's health (2002) JO - J Womens Health (Larchmt) VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) plays a major role in the perinatal outcome for mother and neonate. With the rising prevalence of obesity, the role of prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) as an independent risk factor for PIH and a target for preconception care is important to explore. METHODS: We completed a retrospective cohort study of 16,582 women who received obstetrical care at a regional medical center and delivered a singleton pregnancy between 2003 and 2006. Clinical data were derived from the electronic medical record. Logistic regression was used to explore the association of demographic characteristics and medical risk factors with the outcome of PIH. RESULTS: Diagnoses of chronic hypertension, prepregnancy diabetes, and gestational diabetes were more likely in women with increasing prepregnancy maternal BMI (p < 0.0001). The odds of PIH also increased with BMI, ranging from an odds ratio (OR) of 1.99 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.73-2.31) for overweight women through OR 4.26 (95% CI 3.37-5.38) for those with a BMI of ≥40 kg/m(2). Other risk factors for PIH included chronic hypertension (OR 6.57, 95% CI 5.43-7.95), nulliparity (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.69-2.12), prepregnancy diabetes (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.33-3.17), and gestational diabetes (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04-1.58). The presence of chronic hypertension modified the association between obesity and PIH; for women with chronic hypertension, obesity was not associated with PIH (adjusted OR [aOR] 1.39, 95% CI 0.77-2.50 for BMI 30-34.9; aOR 0.98, 95% CI 0.52-1.87 for BMI 35-39.9; and aOR 1.33, 95% CI 0.73-2.43 for BMI ≥40 kg/m(2)) compared with women with a BMI in the normal range. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of PIH rises with maternal prepregnancy BMI independent of other obesity-associated comorbidity. Women with chronic hypertension carry the greatest risk of PIH but incur no obesity-associated increase in risk. SN - 1931-843X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21194273/Prepregnancy_body_mass_index_as_an_independent_risk_factor_for_pregnancy_induced_hypertension_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/jwh.2010.1970?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -