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Heme iron from meat and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis and a review of the mechanisms involved.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 2011; 4(2):177-84CP

Abstract

Red meat and processed meat intake is associated with a risk of colorectal cancer, a major cause of death in affluent countries. Epidemiological and experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that heme iron present in meat promotes colorectal cancer. This meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies of colon cancer reporting heme intake included 566,607 individuals and 4,734 cases of colon cancer. The relative risk of colon cancer was 1.18 (95% CI: 1.06-1.32) for subjects in the highest category of heme iron intake compared with those in the lowest category. Epidemiological data thus show a suggestive association between dietary heme and risk of colon cancer. The analysis of experimental studies in rats with chemically-induced colon cancer showed that dietary hemoglobin and red meat consistently promote aberrant crypt foci, a putative precancer lesion. The mechanism is not known, but heme iron has a catalytic effect on (i) the endogenous formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds and (ii) the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic aldehydes by lipoperoxidation. A review of evidence supporting these hypotheses suggests that both pathways are involved in heme iron toxicity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

INRA TOXALIM (Research Centre in Food Toxicology), Université de Toulouse; INP ENVT, Toulouse, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21209396

Citation

Bastide, Nadia M., et al. "Heme Iron From Meat and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: a Meta-analysis and a Review of the Mechanisms Involved." Cancer Prevention Research (Philadelphia, Pa.), vol. 4, no. 2, 2011, pp. 177-84.
Bastide NM, Pierre FH, Corpet DE. Heme iron from meat and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis and a review of the mechanisms involved. Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2011;4(2):177-84.
Bastide, N. M., Pierre, F. H., & Corpet, D. E. (2011). Heme iron from meat and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis and a review of the mechanisms involved. Cancer Prevention Research (Philadelphia, Pa.), 4(2), pp. 177-84. doi:10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-10-0113.
Bastide NM, Pierre FH, Corpet DE. Heme Iron From Meat and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: a Meta-analysis and a Review of the Mechanisms Involved. Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2011;4(2):177-84. PubMed PMID: 21209396.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heme iron from meat and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis and a review of the mechanisms involved. AU - Bastide,Nadia M, AU - Pierre,Fabrice H F, AU - Corpet,Denis E, Y1 - 2011/01/05/ PY - 2011/1/7/entrez PY - 2011/1/7/pubmed PY - 2011/5/20/medline SP - 177 EP - 84 JF - Cancer prevention research (Philadelphia, Pa.) JO - Cancer Prev Res (Phila) VL - 4 IS - 2 N2 - Red meat and processed meat intake is associated with a risk of colorectal cancer, a major cause of death in affluent countries. Epidemiological and experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that heme iron present in meat promotes colorectal cancer. This meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies of colon cancer reporting heme intake included 566,607 individuals and 4,734 cases of colon cancer. The relative risk of colon cancer was 1.18 (95% CI: 1.06-1.32) for subjects in the highest category of heme iron intake compared with those in the lowest category. Epidemiological data thus show a suggestive association between dietary heme and risk of colon cancer. The analysis of experimental studies in rats with chemically-induced colon cancer showed that dietary hemoglobin and red meat consistently promote aberrant crypt foci, a putative precancer lesion. The mechanism is not known, but heme iron has a catalytic effect on (i) the endogenous formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds and (ii) the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic aldehydes by lipoperoxidation. A review of evidence supporting these hypotheses suggests that both pathways are involved in heme iron toxicity. SN - 1940-6215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21209396/Heme_iron_from_meat_and_risk_of_colorectal_cancer:_a_meta_analysis_and_a_review_of_the_mechanisms_involved_ L2 - http://cancerpreventionresearch.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=21209396 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -