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Sebaceous adenitis in Havanese dogs: a retrospective study of the clinical presentation and incidence.

Abstract

Sebaceous adenitis is a suspected immune-mediated disease that targets and destroys sebaceous glands. This retrospective study evaluated the clinical presentation and incidence of sebaceous adenitis in Havanese dogs. Sebaceous adenitis was diagnosed in 35% (12 of 34) of Havanese dogs presented over a 5-year period. Onset of clinical signs occurred during young adulthood. Follicular casts were present in 92% (11 of 12) of affected dogs. Other common clinical signs included alopecia and hypotrichosis. The trunk, head and ears were commonly affected, with 67% (8 of 12) of cases having pinnal and/or external ear canal involvement. Secondary pyoderma was seen in 42% (5 of 12) of dogs. Histopathology revealed absent sebaceous glands in 83% (10 of 12) and a lymphoplasmacytic periadnexal infiltrate in 92% (11 of 12) of samples. Treatment included multiple modalities. Cyclosporin was prescribed in 83% (10 of 12) of cases. Other systemic therapies included vitamin A and fatty acid supplementation. Topical therapies included antiseborrhoeic shampoos and sprays, and oil soaks. Follow-up ranging from 2 months to 3 years was obtained in 67% (8 of 12) of dogs. Improvement ranged from minimal to marked, with better clinical response associated with longer duration of treatment. Owners with follow-up of more than 1 year commonly reported occasional flares of the clinical signs. This study found that sebaceous adenitis was a common diagnosis in Havanese dogs, that the ears were commonly affected and that a lymphoplasmacytic periadnexal infiltrate associated with absent sebaceous glands was frequently seen on dermatohistopathological examination.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Dermatology for Animals, 86 West Juniper Avenue Gilbert, AZ 85233, USA. frazerdvm@gmail.com

    , ,

    Source

    Veterinary dermatology 22:3 2011 Jun pg 267-74

    MeSH

    Animals
    Dermatologic Agents
    Dog Diseases
    Dogs
    Female
    Incidence
    Lymphadenitis
    Male
    Retrospective Studies
    Sebaceous Gland Diseases
    Southwestern United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21210878

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Sebaceous adenitis in Havanese dogs: a retrospective study of the clinical presentation and incidence. AU - Frazer,Megan M, AU - Schick,Anthea E, AU - Lewis,Thomas P, AU - Jazic,Edward, Y1 - 2011/01/06/ PY - 2011/1/8/entrez PY - 2011/1/8/pubmed PY - 2011/8/31/medline SP - 267 EP - 74 JF - Veterinary dermatology JO - Vet. Dermatol. VL - 22 IS - 3 N2 - Sebaceous adenitis is a suspected immune-mediated disease that targets and destroys sebaceous glands. This retrospective study evaluated the clinical presentation and incidence of sebaceous adenitis in Havanese dogs. Sebaceous adenitis was diagnosed in 35% (12 of 34) of Havanese dogs presented over a 5-year period. Onset of clinical signs occurred during young adulthood. Follicular casts were present in 92% (11 of 12) of affected dogs. Other common clinical signs included alopecia and hypotrichosis. The trunk, head and ears were commonly affected, with 67% (8 of 12) of cases having pinnal and/or external ear canal involvement. Secondary pyoderma was seen in 42% (5 of 12) of dogs. Histopathology revealed absent sebaceous glands in 83% (10 of 12) and a lymphoplasmacytic periadnexal infiltrate in 92% (11 of 12) of samples. Treatment included multiple modalities. Cyclosporin was prescribed in 83% (10 of 12) of cases. Other systemic therapies included vitamin A and fatty acid supplementation. Topical therapies included antiseborrhoeic shampoos and sprays, and oil soaks. Follow-up ranging from 2 months to 3 years was obtained in 67% (8 of 12) of dogs. Improvement ranged from minimal to marked, with better clinical response associated with longer duration of treatment. Owners with follow-up of more than 1 year commonly reported occasional flares of the clinical signs. This study found that sebaceous adenitis was a common diagnosis in Havanese dogs, that the ears were commonly affected and that a lymphoplasmacytic periadnexal infiltrate associated with absent sebaceous glands was frequently seen on dermatohistopathological examination. SN - 1365-3164 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21210878/abstract/Sebaceous_adenitis_in_Havanese_dogs:_a_retrospective_study_of_the_clinical_presentation_and_incidence_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3164.2010.00942.x ER -