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Intergenerational cultural dissonance in parent-adolescent relationships among Chinese and European Americans.
Dev Psychol. 2011 Mar; 47(2):493-508.DP

Abstract

Generational cultural gaps (assessed as the mismatch between adolescents' ideals and perceptions of the parent-adolescent relationship) were investigated among Chinese youth with immigrant parents and their European American counterparts who have been in the United States for generations and assumingly do not have intergenerational cultural gaps. The authors of the study examined the associations of such generational gaps with adolescents' behavioral problems and whether youth's appreciation of Chinese parent-adolescent relationships (parental devotion, sacrifice, thoughtfulness, and guan) described by the notion of qin would moderate the relationship between discrepancies and youth's adjustment. A total of 634 high school students (M = 15.97 years; 95 and 154 first- and second-generation Chinese American respectively, and 385 European Americans) completed measures of parental warmth, parent-adolescent open communication, qin, and psychological adjustment. The U.S.-born Chinese American adolescents' ideals exceeded perceptions of parents' warmth and open communication to a greater degree than it did for European American adolescents (ps < 0.05). Such discrepancies in parental warmth were related to greater internalizing symptoms for second-generation Chinese American youth than for their European American peers. In addition, for second-generation Chinese, their perceptions of qin, particularly parents' devotion and sacrifice, had stronger moderating effects, diminishing the associations between generational cultural gaps and youth's behavioral problems compared with those of European American and first-generation Chinese youth. Parental thoughtfulness also played a similar beneficial role, but did so for all youth.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of California at Riverside, CA, USA. cwu002@gmail.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21219066

Citation

Wu, Chunxia, and Ruth K. Chao. "Intergenerational Cultural Dissonance in Parent-adolescent Relationships Among Chinese and European Americans." Developmental Psychology, vol. 47, no. 2, 2011, pp. 493-508.
Wu C, Chao RK. Intergenerational cultural dissonance in parent-adolescent relationships among Chinese and European Americans. Dev Psychol. 2011;47(2):493-508.
Wu, C., & Chao, R. K. (2011). Intergenerational cultural dissonance in parent-adolescent relationships among Chinese and European Americans. Developmental Psychology, 47(2), 493-508. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0021063
Wu C, Chao RK. Intergenerational Cultural Dissonance in Parent-adolescent Relationships Among Chinese and European Americans. Dev Psychol. 2011;47(2):493-508. PubMed PMID: 21219066.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intergenerational cultural dissonance in parent-adolescent relationships among Chinese and European Americans. AU - Wu,Chunxia, AU - Chao,Ruth K, PY - 2011/1/12/entrez PY - 2011/1/12/pubmed PY - 2011/7/2/medline SP - 493 EP - 508 JF - Developmental psychology JO - Dev Psychol VL - 47 IS - 2 N2 - Generational cultural gaps (assessed as the mismatch between adolescents' ideals and perceptions of the parent-adolescent relationship) were investigated among Chinese youth with immigrant parents and their European American counterparts who have been in the United States for generations and assumingly do not have intergenerational cultural gaps. The authors of the study examined the associations of such generational gaps with adolescents' behavioral problems and whether youth's appreciation of Chinese parent-adolescent relationships (parental devotion, sacrifice, thoughtfulness, and guan) described by the notion of qin would moderate the relationship between discrepancies and youth's adjustment. A total of 634 high school students (M = 15.97 years; 95 and 154 first- and second-generation Chinese American respectively, and 385 European Americans) completed measures of parental warmth, parent-adolescent open communication, qin, and psychological adjustment. The U.S.-born Chinese American adolescents' ideals exceeded perceptions of parents' warmth and open communication to a greater degree than it did for European American adolescents (ps < 0.05). Such discrepancies in parental warmth were related to greater internalizing symptoms for second-generation Chinese American youth than for their European American peers. In addition, for second-generation Chinese, their perceptions of qin, particularly parents' devotion and sacrifice, had stronger moderating effects, diminishing the associations between generational cultural gaps and youth's behavioral problems compared with those of European American and first-generation Chinese youth. Parental thoughtfulness also played a similar beneficial role, but did so for all youth. SN - 1939-0599 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21219066/Intergenerational_cultural_dissonance_in_parent_adolescent_relationships_among_Chinese_and_European_Americans_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/dev/47/2/493 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -