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Peer-led prenatal breast-feeding education: a viable alternative to nurse-led education.
Midwifery. 2012 Feb; 28(1):73-9.M

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate a prenatal breast-feeding class developed and facilitated by peer Breast-feeding Buddies.

DESIGN AND INTERVENTIONS

Non-equivalent control group quasi-experimental study comparing participants of the peer-led class (PLC) to those attending an established hospital-based breast-feeding nurse-led class (NLC). A brief questionnaire was completed immediately prior to the class, and telephone interviews were conducted approximately one week following the class, and one and six months post partum.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS

54 expectant mothers who registered for the community PLC and 55 expectant mothers who registered for the NLC.

MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS

Breast-feeding intentions were measured at all time-points. Class evaluations, breast-feeding experiences, and breast-feeding support were measured at all post-class interviews. Both classes were considered worthwhile, but the PLC class was rated as more helpful and participants appreciated learning from the peers' personal experiences. Mothers taught by peers were more likely to access peer breast-feeding support. PLC participants initially decreased their prenatal breast-feeding duration intentions but had significantly stronger intentions to continue breast feeding at six months than did NLC mothers.

KEY CONCLUSIONS

A peer-led prenatal breast-feeding class is as effective as a traditional model of breast-feeding education and is a valuable tool to promote and support successful breast feeding. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Peer-led breast-feeding classes should be provided to enhance the accessibility of breast-feeding education and support for expectant mothers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nursing, Brock University, 500 Glenridge Ave., St. Catharines, Canada ON L2S 3A1. lrempel@brocku.caNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21236530

Citation

Rempel, Lynn A., and Katrina C J. Moore. "Peer-led Prenatal Breast-feeding Education: a Viable Alternative to Nurse-led Education." Midwifery, vol. 28, no. 1, 2012, pp. 73-9.
Rempel LA, Moore KC. Peer-led prenatal breast-feeding education: a viable alternative to nurse-led education. Midwifery. 2012;28(1):73-9.
Rempel, L. A., & Moore, K. C. (2012). Peer-led prenatal breast-feeding education: a viable alternative to nurse-led education. Midwifery, 28(1), 73-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2010.11.005
Rempel LA, Moore KC. Peer-led Prenatal Breast-feeding Education: a Viable Alternative to Nurse-led Education. Midwifery. 2012;28(1):73-9. PubMed PMID: 21236530.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Peer-led prenatal breast-feeding education: a viable alternative to nurse-led education. AU - Rempel,Lynn A, AU - Moore,Katrina C J, Y1 - 2011/01/13/ PY - 2010/09/01/received PY - 2010/11/09/revised PY - 2010/11/13/accepted PY - 2011/1/18/entrez PY - 2011/1/18/pubmed PY - 2012/5/16/medline SP - 73 EP - 9 JF - Midwifery JO - Midwifery VL - 28 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a prenatal breast-feeding class developed and facilitated by peer Breast-feeding Buddies. DESIGN AND INTERVENTIONS: Non-equivalent control group quasi-experimental study comparing participants of the peer-led class (PLC) to those attending an established hospital-based breast-feeding nurse-led class (NLC). A brief questionnaire was completed immediately prior to the class, and telephone interviews were conducted approximately one week following the class, and one and six months post partum. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: 54 expectant mothers who registered for the community PLC and 55 expectant mothers who registered for the NLC. MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS: Breast-feeding intentions were measured at all time-points. Class evaluations, breast-feeding experiences, and breast-feeding support were measured at all post-class interviews. Both classes were considered worthwhile, but the PLC class was rated as more helpful and participants appreciated learning from the peers' personal experiences. Mothers taught by peers were more likely to access peer breast-feeding support. PLC participants initially decreased their prenatal breast-feeding duration intentions but had significantly stronger intentions to continue breast feeding at six months than did NLC mothers. KEY CONCLUSIONS: A peer-led prenatal breast-feeding class is as effective as a traditional model of breast-feeding education and is a valuable tool to promote and support successful breast feeding. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Peer-led breast-feeding classes should be provided to enhance the accessibility of breast-feeding education and support for expectant mothers. SN - 1532-3099 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21236530/Peer_led_prenatal_breast_feeding_education:_a_viable_alternative_to_nurse_led_education_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0266-6138(10)00184-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -