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Women at war: implications for mental health.
J Trauma Dissociation. 2011; 12(1):25-37.JT

Abstract

Few studies have investigated the impact of deployment stressors on the mental health outcomes of women deployed to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. This pilot study examined exposure to combat experiences and military sexual harassment in a sample of 54 active duty women and assessed the impact of these stressors on post-deployment posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and depressive symptoms. Within 3 months of returning from deployment to Iraq, participants completed (a) the Combat Experiences Scale and the Sexual Harassment Scale of the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory, (b) the Primary Care PTSD Screen, and (c) an abbreviated version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale. Approximately three quarters of the sample endorsed exposure to combat experiences, and more than half of the sample reported experiencing deployment-related sexual harassment, with nearly half of the sample endorsing both stressors. Approximately one third of the sample endorsed clinical or subclinical levels of PTSD symptoms, with 11% screening positive for PTSD and 9% to 14% of the sample endorsing depressive symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that combat experiences and sexual harassment jointly accounted for significant variance in post-deployment PTSD symptoms, whereas military sexual harassment was identified as the only unique significant predictor of these symptoms. Findings from the present study lend support to research demonstrating that military sexual trauma may be more highly associated with post-deployment PTSD symptoms than combat exposure among female service members and veterans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tripler Army Medical Center and the National Center forPosttraumatic Stress Disorder, Pacific Islands Division, Pacific Islands VA Health Care System, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. lissamdutra@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21240736

Citation

Dutra, Lissa, et al. "Women at War: Implications for Mental Health." Journal of Trauma & Dissociation : the Official Journal of the International Society for the Study of Dissociation (ISSD), vol. 12, no. 1, 2011, pp. 25-37.
Dutra L, Grubbs K, Greene C, et al. Women at war: implications for mental health. J Trauma Dissociation. 2011;12(1):25-37.
Dutra, L., Grubbs, K., Greene, C., Trego, L. L., McCartin, T. L., Kloezeman, K., & Morland, L. (2011). Women at war: implications for mental health. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation : the Official Journal of the International Society for the Study of Dissociation (ISSD), 12(1), 25-37. https://doi.org/10.1080/15299732.2010.496141
Dutra L, et al. Women at War: Implications for Mental Health. J Trauma Dissociation. 2011;12(1):25-37. PubMed PMID: 21240736.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Women at war: implications for mental health. AU - Dutra,Lissa, AU - Grubbs,Kathleen, AU - Greene,Carolyn, AU - Trego,Lori L, AU - McCartin,Tamarin L, AU - Kloezeman,Karen, AU - Morland,Leslie, PY - 2011/1/18/entrez PY - 2011/1/18/pubmed PY - 2011/6/3/medline SP - 25 EP - 37 JF - Journal of trauma & dissociation : the official journal of the International Society for the Study of Dissociation (ISSD) JO - J Trauma Dissociation VL - 12 IS - 1 N2 - Few studies have investigated the impact of deployment stressors on the mental health outcomes of women deployed to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. This pilot study examined exposure to combat experiences and military sexual harassment in a sample of 54 active duty women and assessed the impact of these stressors on post-deployment posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and depressive symptoms. Within 3 months of returning from deployment to Iraq, participants completed (a) the Combat Experiences Scale and the Sexual Harassment Scale of the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory, (b) the Primary Care PTSD Screen, and (c) an abbreviated version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale. Approximately three quarters of the sample endorsed exposure to combat experiences, and more than half of the sample reported experiencing deployment-related sexual harassment, with nearly half of the sample endorsing both stressors. Approximately one third of the sample endorsed clinical or subclinical levels of PTSD symptoms, with 11% screening positive for PTSD and 9% to 14% of the sample endorsing depressive symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that combat experiences and sexual harassment jointly accounted for significant variance in post-deployment PTSD symptoms, whereas military sexual harassment was identified as the only unique significant predictor of these symptoms. Findings from the present study lend support to research demonstrating that military sexual trauma may be more highly associated with post-deployment PTSD symptoms than combat exposure among female service members and veterans. SN - 1529-9740 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21240736/Women_at_war:_implications_for_mental_health_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15299732.2010.496141 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -