Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The effects of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on perinatal outcomes in Korean women: a retrospective cohort study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain on perinatal outcomes in a population of Korean women.

METHODS

We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 2,454 women who had received antenatal care at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital from January 2007 to December 2009. We used World Health Organization definitions for Asian populations of underweight (BMI < 18.5), normal (BMI equal or higher 18.5 and < 23), overweight (BMI equal or higher 23 and < 25), and obese (BMI equal or higher 25). We analyzed perinatal outcomes according to the pre-pregnancy BMI and weight gain during pregnancy, and calculated the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from multiple logistic regression models by considering maternal age, parity, number of fetuses, length of gestation, and medical history.

RESULTS

Among obese women, the adjusted ORs for gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorder, and incompetent internal os of cervix were 4.46, 2.53, and 3.70 (95% CI = 2.63-7.59, 1.26-5.07, and 1.50-9.12), respectively, and the adjusted ORs for neonatal complications such as macrosomia and low Apgar score were 2.08 and 1.98 (95% CI = 1.34-3.22 and 1.19-3.29), respectively, compared with normal weight women. However, there was no positive linear association between gestational weight gain and obstetric outcomes. In normal weight women, maternal and neonatal complications were significantly increased with inadequate weight gain during pregnancy (p < 0.0001 and = 0.0180, respectively), and we observed similar results in underweight women (p = 0.0136 and 0.0004, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

This study shows that pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity are more closely related to the adverse obstetric outcomes than excess weight gain during pregnancy. In addition, inadequate weight gain during pregnancy can result in significant complications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21241516

Citation

Choi, Sae-Kyung, et al. "The Effects of Pre-pregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain On Perinatal Outcomes in Korean Women: a Retrospective Cohort Study." Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology : RB&E, vol. 9, 2011, p. 6.
Choi SK, Park IY, Shin JC. The effects of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on perinatal outcomes in Korean women: a retrospective cohort study. Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2011;9:6.
Choi, S. K., Park, I. Y., & Shin, J. C. (2011). The effects of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on perinatal outcomes in Korean women: a retrospective cohort study. Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology : RB&E, 9, p. 6. doi:10.1186/1477-7827-9-6.
Choi SK, Park IY, Shin JC. The Effects of Pre-pregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain On Perinatal Outcomes in Korean Women: a Retrospective Cohort Study. Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2011 Jan 18;9:6. PubMed PMID: 21241516.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on perinatal outcomes in Korean women: a retrospective cohort study. AU - Choi,Sae-Kyung, AU - Park,In-Yang, AU - Shin,Jong-chul, Y1 - 2011/01/18/ PY - 2010/10/12/received PY - 2011/01/18/accepted PY - 2011/1/19/entrez PY - 2011/1/19/pubmed PY - 2011/4/30/medline SP - 6 EP - 6 JF - Reproductive biology and endocrinology : RB&E JO - Reprod. Biol. Endocrinol. VL - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain on perinatal outcomes in a population of Korean women. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 2,454 women who had received antenatal care at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital from January 2007 to December 2009. We used World Health Organization definitions for Asian populations of underweight (BMI < 18.5), normal (BMI equal or higher 18.5 and < 23), overweight (BMI equal or higher 23 and < 25), and obese (BMI equal or higher 25). We analyzed perinatal outcomes according to the pre-pregnancy BMI and weight gain during pregnancy, and calculated the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from multiple logistic regression models by considering maternal age, parity, number of fetuses, length of gestation, and medical history. RESULTS: Among obese women, the adjusted ORs for gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorder, and incompetent internal os of cervix were 4.46, 2.53, and 3.70 (95% CI = 2.63-7.59, 1.26-5.07, and 1.50-9.12), respectively, and the adjusted ORs for neonatal complications such as macrosomia and low Apgar score were 2.08 and 1.98 (95% CI = 1.34-3.22 and 1.19-3.29), respectively, compared with normal weight women. However, there was no positive linear association between gestational weight gain and obstetric outcomes. In normal weight women, maternal and neonatal complications were significantly increased with inadequate weight gain during pregnancy (p < 0.0001 and = 0.0180, respectively), and we observed similar results in underweight women (p = 0.0136 and 0.0004, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity are more closely related to the adverse obstetric outcomes than excess weight gain during pregnancy. In addition, inadequate weight gain during pregnancy can result in significant complications. SN - 1477-7827 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21241516/The_effects_of_pre_pregnancy_body_mass_index_and_gestational_weight_gain_on_perinatal_outcomes_in_Korean_women:_a_retrospective_cohort_study_ L2 - https://rbej.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1477-7827-9-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -