Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Do nutrition programs make a difference? The case of Brazil.
Int J Health Serv. 1990; 20(4):691-715.IJ

Abstract

Four Brazilian food and nutrition programs operating during some part of 1974-86 are evaluated for their effectiveness in curing or preventing infant and child malnutrition, including low birth weight when pregnant women were beneficiaries. Two programs distributed free food to identified clients: traditional commercial foods in one case and specially formulated supplements in the other. The other two programs subsidized four or more basic foodstuffs: one experiment quantitatively restricted a subsidy to identified families, and the other was unrestricted and open to all families patronizing certain shops. The programs were more effective at curing than at preventing malnutrition, and more effective at increasing weight than height. Many beneficiaries, even when initially underweight, showed no change, and some deteriorated despite the food transfer. Results were better after than during the first year of life, when deterioration is most likely. Donation programs including medical and educational components proved more effective than pure subsidies, showing that while poverty may be the chief cause of malnutrition, the problem should be seen as poor health rather than simply low food consumption. Evaluation also shows that programs were inefficient in transferring benefits, and that clients were deterred from participating by the costs of obtaining the food and its poor quality and small volume. Longer participation improved results, but more frequent participation in a given interval did not necessarily do so.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Latin American Technical Department, World Bank, Washington, DC 20433.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2125029

Citation

Musgrove, P. "Do Nutrition Programs Make a Difference? the Case of Brazil." International Journal of Health Services : Planning, Administration, Evaluation, vol. 20, no. 4, 1990, pp. 691-715.
Musgrove P. Do nutrition programs make a difference? The case of Brazil. Int J Health Serv. 1990;20(4):691-715.
Musgrove, P. (1990). Do nutrition programs make a difference? The case of Brazil. International Journal of Health Services : Planning, Administration, Evaluation, 20(4), 691-715.
Musgrove P. Do Nutrition Programs Make a Difference? the Case of Brazil. Int J Health Serv. 1990;20(4):691-715. PubMed PMID: 2125029.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Do nutrition programs make a difference? The case of Brazil. A1 - Musgrove,P, PY - 1990/1/1/pubmed PY - 1990/1/1/medline PY - 1990/1/1/entrez KW - Age Factors KW - Americas KW - Brazil KW - Child Health KW - Child Health Services KW - Comparative Studies KW - Critique KW - Delivery Of Health Care KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Distributional Activities KW - Economic Factors KW - Education KW - Health KW - Health Education KW - Health Services KW - Infant KW - International Agencies KW - Latin America KW - Malnutrition--prevention and control KW - Maternal-child Health Services KW - Nutrition KW - Nutrition Disorders KW - Nutrition Indexes KW - Nutrition Programs KW - Organization And Administration KW - Organizations KW - Paho KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Poverty KW - Primary Health Care KW - Program Activities KW - Program Effectiveness KW - Program Evaluation KW - Programs KW - Research Methodology KW - Research Report KW - Socioeconomic Factors KW - South America KW - Studies KW - Un KW - Who KW - World Bank KW - Youth SP - 691 EP - 715 JF - International journal of health services : planning, administration, evaluation JO - Int J Health Serv VL - 20 IS - 4 N2 - Four Brazilian food and nutrition programs operating during some part of 1974-86 are evaluated for their effectiveness in curing or preventing infant and child malnutrition, including low birth weight when pregnant women were beneficiaries. Two programs distributed free food to identified clients: traditional commercial foods in one case and specially formulated supplements in the other. The other two programs subsidized four or more basic foodstuffs: one experiment quantitatively restricted a subsidy to identified families, and the other was unrestricted and open to all families patronizing certain shops. The programs were more effective at curing than at preventing malnutrition, and more effective at increasing weight than height. Many beneficiaries, even when initially underweight, showed no change, and some deteriorated despite the food transfer. Results were better after than during the first year of life, when deterioration is most likely. Donation programs including medical and educational components proved more effective than pure subsidies, showing that while poverty may be the chief cause of malnutrition, the problem should be seen as poor health rather than simply low food consumption. Evaluation also shows that programs were inefficient in transferring benefits, and that clients were deterred from participating by the costs of obtaining the food and its poor quality and small volume. Longer participation improved results, but more frequent participation in a given interval did not necessarily do so. SN - 0020-7314 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2125029/Do_nutrition_programs_make_a_difference_The_case_of_Brazil_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.2190/W6EU-5DGB-EX4R-U7W2?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -