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Preventing children's aggression in immigrant Latino families: a mixed methods evaluation of the Families and Schools Together program.
Am J Community Psychol. 2011 Sep; 48(1-2):65-76.AJ

Abstract

The effectiveness of the evidence based program, Families and Schools Together (FAST), was examined in two inter-related studies with immigrant Latino (Mexican) families in the U.S. In Study 1, we reported findings from pre-test, 3-month post-test, and 12-month follow-up surveys of parents and children participating in the FAST program. Families were selected from communities that were randomly assigned to either intervention or control groups. A total of 282 parents (263 mothers and 19 fathers) participated in either the intervention (140 parents) or control (142 parents) condition over the course of 3 years. Each of the parents had a participating focal child; thus, 282 children (144 females and 138 males; average age = 9.5 years) participated in the study. A primary focus of the research was to determine whether participation in FAST led to reductions in children's aggression. Using linear growth models, no differences were noted on aggression between intervention and control groups, although intervention children did show significant improvements in social problem-solving skills and perceptions of collective efficacy. In Study 2, we conducted two focus groups with ten FAST participants to explore whether other unmeasured outcomes were noted and to understand better the mechanisms and impact of FAST. All of the parents in the focus groups reported that FAST had helped them better relate to and communicate with their children, and that the greatest effect was on the behavior of their older children. Results are discussed in terms of cultural fit of the FAST program for immigrant Latino families and future directions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

LA Net, A Project of Community Partners, Long Beach, CA 90808, USA. knox@usc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21253821

Citation

Knox, Lyndee, et al. "Preventing Children's Aggression in Immigrant Latino Families: a Mixed Methods Evaluation of the Families and Schools Together Program." American Journal of Community Psychology, vol. 48, no. 1-2, 2011, pp. 65-76.
Knox L, Guerra NG, Williams KR, et al. Preventing children's aggression in immigrant Latino families: a mixed methods evaluation of the Families and Schools Together program. Am J Community Psychol. 2011;48(1-2):65-76.
Knox, L., Guerra, N. G., Williams, K. R., & Toro, R. (2011). Preventing children's aggression in immigrant Latino families: a mixed methods evaluation of the Families and Schools Together program. American Journal of Community Psychology, 48(1-2), 65-76. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10464-010-9411-0
Knox L, et al. Preventing Children's Aggression in Immigrant Latino Families: a Mixed Methods Evaluation of the Families and Schools Together Program. Am J Community Psychol. 2011;48(1-2):65-76. PubMed PMID: 21253821.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preventing children's aggression in immigrant Latino families: a mixed methods evaluation of the Families and Schools Together program. AU - Knox,Lyndee, AU - Guerra,Nancy G, AU - Williams,Kirk R, AU - Toro,Rosa, PY - 2011/1/22/entrez PY - 2011/1/22/pubmed PY - 2011/12/13/medline SP - 65 EP - 76 JF - American journal of community psychology JO - Am J Community Psychol VL - 48 IS - 1-2 N2 - The effectiveness of the evidence based program, Families and Schools Together (FAST), was examined in two inter-related studies with immigrant Latino (Mexican) families in the U.S. In Study 1, we reported findings from pre-test, 3-month post-test, and 12-month follow-up surveys of parents and children participating in the FAST program. Families were selected from communities that were randomly assigned to either intervention or control groups. A total of 282 parents (263 mothers and 19 fathers) participated in either the intervention (140 parents) or control (142 parents) condition over the course of 3 years. Each of the parents had a participating focal child; thus, 282 children (144 females and 138 males; average age = 9.5 years) participated in the study. A primary focus of the research was to determine whether participation in FAST led to reductions in children's aggression. Using linear growth models, no differences were noted on aggression between intervention and control groups, although intervention children did show significant improvements in social problem-solving skills and perceptions of collective efficacy. In Study 2, we conducted two focus groups with ten FAST participants to explore whether other unmeasured outcomes were noted and to understand better the mechanisms and impact of FAST. All of the parents in the focus groups reported that FAST had helped them better relate to and communicate with their children, and that the greatest effect was on the behavior of their older children. Results are discussed in terms of cultural fit of the FAST program for immigrant Latino families and future directions. SN - 1573-2770 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21253821/Preventing_children's_aggression_in_immigrant_Latino_families:_a_mixed_methods_evaluation_of_the_Families_and_Schools_Together_program_ L2 - https://www.springerlink.com/10.1007/s10464-010-9411-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -