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Application of the major capsid protein as a marker of the phylogenetic diversity of Emiliania huxleyi viruses.
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2011 May; 76(2):373-80.FM

Abstract

Studies of the Phycodnaviridae have traditionally relied on the DNA polymerase (pol) gene as a biomarker. However, recent investigations have suggested that the major capsid protein (MCP) gene may be a reliable phylogenetic biomarker. We used MCP gene amplicons gathered across the North Atlantic to assess the diversity of Emiliania huxleyi-infecting Phycodnaviridae. Nucleotide sequences were examined across >6000 km of open ocean, with comparisons between concentrates of the virus-size fraction of seawater and of lysates generated by exposing host strains to these same virus concentrates. Analyses revealed that many sequences were only sampled once, while several were over-represented. Analyses also revealed nucleotide sequences distinct from previous coastal isolates. Examination of lysed cultures revealed a new richness in phylogeny, as MCP sequences previously unrepresented within the existing collection of E. huxleyi viruses (EhV) were associated with viruses lysing cultures. Sequences were compared with previously described EhV MCP sequences from the North Sea and a Norwegian Fjord, as well as from the Gulf of Maine. Principal component analysis indicates that location-specific distinctions exist despite the presence of sequences common across these environments. Overall, this investigation provides new sequence data and an assessment on the use of the MCP gene.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Microbiology, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0845, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21255053

Citation

Rowe, Janet M., et al. "Application of the Major Capsid Protein as a Marker of the Phylogenetic Diversity of Emiliania Huxleyi Viruses." FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 76, no. 2, 2011, pp. 373-80.
Rowe JM, Fabre MF, Gobena D, et al. Application of the major capsid protein as a marker of the phylogenetic diversity of Emiliania huxleyi viruses. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2011;76(2):373-80.
Rowe, J. M., Fabre, M. F., Gobena, D., Wilson, W. H., & Wilhelm, S. W. (2011). Application of the major capsid protein as a marker of the phylogenetic diversity of Emiliania huxleyi viruses. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 76(2), 373-80. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6941.2011.01055.x
Rowe JM, et al. Application of the Major Capsid Protein as a Marker of the Phylogenetic Diversity of Emiliania Huxleyi Viruses. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2011;76(2):373-80. PubMed PMID: 21255053.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Application of the major capsid protein as a marker of the phylogenetic diversity of Emiliania huxleyi viruses. AU - Rowe,Janet M, AU - Fabre,Marie-Françoise, AU - Gobena,Daniel, AU - Wilson,William H, AU - Wilhelm,Steven W, Y1 - 2011/02/14/ PY - 2011/1/25/entrez PY - 2011/1/25/pubmed PY - 2011/6/29/medline SP - 373 EP - 80 JF - FEMS microbiology ecology JO - FEMS Microbiol Ecol VL - 76 IS - 2 N2 - Studies of the Phycodnaviridae have traditionally relied on the DNA polymerase (pol) gene as a biomarker. However, recent investigations have suggested that the major capsid protein (MCP) gene may be a reliable phylogenetic biomarker. We used MCP gene amplicons gathered across the North Atlantic to assess the diversity of Emiliania huxleyi-infecting Phycodnaviridae. Nucleotide sequences were examined across >6000 km of open ocean, with comparisons between concentrates of the virus-size fraction of seawater and of lysates generated by exposing host strains to these same virus concentrates. Analyses revealed that many sequences were only sampled once, while several were over-represented. Analyses also revealed nucleotide sequences distinct from previous coastal isolates. Examination of lysed cultures revealed a new richness in phylogeny, as MCP sequences previously unrepresented within the existing collection of E. huxleyi viruses (EhV) were associated with viruses lysing cultures. Sequences were compared with previously described EhV MCP sequences from the North Sea and a Norwegian Fjord, as well as from the Gulf of Maine. Principal component analysis indicates that location-specific distinctions exist despite the presence of sequences common across these environments. Overall, this investigation provides new sequence data and an assessment on the use of the MCP gene. SN - 1574-6941 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21255053/Application_of_the_major_capsid_protein_as_a_marker_of_the_phylogenetic_diversity_of_Emiliania_huxleyi_viruses_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/femsec/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/j.1574-6941.2011.01055.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -