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Effect of race on the frequency of postoperative atrial fibrillation following coronary artery bypass grafting.
Am J Cardiol. 2011 Feb 01; 107(3):383-6.AJ

Abstract

Atrial fibrillation (AF) commonly complicates the postoperative course after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Among the general population, African Americans have been shown to have a lower prevalence of AF than European Americans. Although many factors have been identified to predict risk for postoperative AF, race has not been examined. All patients aged ≥18 years who underwent CABG at Henry Ford Hospital during a 5-year period from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2008, were included. Patients were excluded for any previous diagnosis of AF or if they had concomitant valve surgery at the time of CABG. The incidence of AF was determined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, coding from postoperative hospitalization records. Overall, 1,001 patients were eligible for analysis. Of these, 731 (73%) were European American and 270 (27%) were African American. The African American group had a higher prevalence of hypertension (75.6% vs 58.8%, p <0.001) and heart failure (22.6% vs 15.7%, p = 0.01) and a trend toward a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (38.1% vs 33.4%, p = 0.159). Postoperative AF was diagnosed in 214 European Americans (29.3%) and 50 African Americans (18.5%) (p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis adjusting for age strata, gender, hypertension, diabetes, and heart failure, African Americans had less postoperative AF than European Americans, with an adjusted odds ratio of 0.539 (95% confidence interval 0.374 to 0.777, p = 0.001). In conclusion, African Americans have a significantly reduced incidence of AF compared to European Americans after CABG.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Henry Ford Hospital, Edith and Benson Ford Heart and Vascular Institute, Detroit, Michigan, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21257002

Citation

Lahiri, Marc K., et al. "Effect of Race On the Frequency of Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation Following Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting." The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 107, no. 3, 2011, pp. 383-6.
Lahiri MK, Fang K, Lamerato L, et al. Effect of race on the frequency of postoperative atrial fibrillation following coronary artery bypass grafting. Am J Cardiol. 2011;107(3):383-6.
Lahiri, M. K., Fang, K., Lamerato, L., Khan, A. M., & Schuger, C. D. (2011). Effect of race on the frequency of postoperative atrial fibrillation following coronary artery bypass grafting. The American Journal of Cardiology, 107(3), 383-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2010.09.032
Lahiri MK, et al. Effect of Race On the Frequency of Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation Following Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting. Am J Cardiol. 2011 Feb 1;107(3):383-6. PubMed PMID: 21257002.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of race on the frequency of postoperative atrial fibrillation following coronary artery bypass grafting. AU - Lahiri,Marc K, AU - Fang,Kan, AU - Lamerato,Lois, AU - Khan,Arfaat M, AU - Schuger,Claudio D, PY - 2010/08/17/received PY - 2010/09/29/revised PY - 2010/09/29/accepted PY - 2011/1/25/entrez PY - 2011/1/25/pubmed PY - 2011/3/2/medline SP - 383 EP - 6 JF - The American journal of cardiology JO - Am J Cardiol VL - 107 IS - 3 N2 - Atrial fibrillation (AF) commonly complicates the postoperative course after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Among the general population, African Americans have been shown to have a lower prevalence of AF than European Americans. Although many factors have been identified to predict risk for postoperative AF, race has not been examined. All patients aged ≥18 years who underwent CABG at Henry Ford Hospital during a 5-year period from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2008, were included. Patients were excluded for any previous diagnosis of AF or if they had concomitant valve surgery at the time of CABG. The incidence of AF was determined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, coding from postoperative hospitalization records. Overall, 1,001 patients were eligible for analysis. Of these, 731 (73%) were European American and 270 (27%) were African American. The African American group had a higher prevalence of hypertension (75.6% vs 58.8%, p <0.001) and heart failure (22.6% vs 15.7%, p = 0.01) and a trend toward a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (38.1% vs 33.4%, p = 0.159). Postoperative AF was diagnosed in 214 European Americans (29.3%) and 50 African Americans (18.5%) (p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis adjusting for age strata, gender, hypertension, diabetes, and heart failure, African Americans had less postoperative AF than European Americans, with an adjusted odds ratio of 0.539 (95% confidence interval 0.374 to 0.777, p = 0.001). In conclusion, African Americans have a significantly reduced incidence of AF compared to European Americans after CABG. SN - 1879-1913 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21257002/Effect_of_race_on_the_frequency_of_postoperative_atrial_fibrillation_following_coronary_artery_bypass_grafting_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9149(10)01979-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -