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Lewy bodies and olfactory dysfunction in old age.
Chem Senses. 2011 May; 36(4):367-73.CS

Abstract

As part of a clinical-pathologic project, older people completed a standard odor identification test at study entry. During a mean of 3.5 years of observation, 201 people died and underwent brain autopsy and neuropathologic examination (6 with a history of Parkinson's disease were excluded). Lewy bodies were identified with antibodies to alpha-synuclein and classified as nigral, limbic, or neocortical based on their distribution in 6 brain regions. Plaques and tangles in 5 regions were summarized with a previously established composite measure, and neuron loss in the substantia nigra was rated on 6-point scale. Odor identification scores ranged from 0 to 12 correct (mean = 8.0, standard deviation = 2.6). On neuropathologic examination, 26 persons had Lewy bodies (13 neocortical, 9 limbic, and 4 nigral). In an analysis adjusted for age, sex, education, and time from olfactory testing to death, limbic (estimate = -2.47, standard error [SE] = 0.73, P < 0.001) and neocortical (estimate = -4.36, SE = 0.63, P < 0.001) Lewy body subgroups were associated with impaired olfaction. Results were comparable in analyses that controlled for dementia or parkinsonism during the study or postmortem measures of plaques and tangles or nigral cell loss. A final set of analyses suggested that impaired olfactory performance may aid detection of underlying Lewy body disease. The findings indicate that Lewy body disease impairs late life olfactory function even in otherwise asymptomatic individuals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, 600 South Paulina Avenue, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. rwilson@rush.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21257733

Citation

Wilson, Robert S., et al. "Lewy Bodies and Olfactory Dysfunction in Old Age." Chemical Senses, vol. 36, no. 4, 2011, pp. 367-73.
Wilson RS, Yu L, Schneider JA, et al. Lewy bodies and olfactory dysfunction in old age. Chem Senses. 2011;36(4):367-73.
Wilson, R. S., Yu, L., Schneider, J. A., Arnold, S. E., Buchman, A. S., & Bennett, D. A. (2011). Lewy bodies and olfactory dysfunction in old age. Chemical Senses, 36(4), 367-73. https://doi.org/10.1093/chemse/bjq139
Wilson RS, et al. Lewy Bodies and Olfactory Dysfunction in Old Age. Chem Senses. 2011;36(4):367-73. PubMed PMID: 21257733.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lewy bodies and olfactory dysfunction in old age. AU - Wilson,Robert S, AU - Yu,Lei, AU - Schneider,Julie A, AU - Arnold,Steven E, AU - Buchman,Aron S, AU - Bennett,David A, Y1 - 2011/01/21/ PY - 2011/1/25/entrez PY - 2011/1/25/pubmed PY - 2011/7/30/medline SP - 367 EP - 73 JF - Chemical senses JO - Chem Senses VL - 36 IS - 4 N2 - As part of a clinical-pathologic project, older people completed a standard odor identification test at study entry. During a mean of 3.5 years of observation, 201 people died and underwent brain autopsy and neuropathologic examination (6 with a history of Parkinson's disease were excluded). Lewy bodies were identified with antibodies to alpha-synuclein and classified as nigral, limbic, or neocortical based on their distribution in 6 brain regions. Plaques and tangles in 5 regions were summarized with a previously established composite measure, and neuron loss in the substantia nigra was rated on 6-point scale. Odor identification scores ranged from 0 to 12 correct (mean = 8.0, standard deviation = 2.6). On neuropathologic examination, 26 persons had Lewy bodies (13 neocortical, 9 limbic, and 4 nigral). In an analysis adjusted for age, sex, education, and time from olfactory testing to death, limbic (estimate = -2.47, standard error [SE] = 0.73, P < 0.001) and neocortical (estimate = -4.36, SE = 0.63, P < 0.001) Lewy body subgroups were associated with impaired olfaction. Results were comparable in analyses that controlled for dementia or parkinsonism during the study or postmortem measures of plaques and tangles or nigral cell loss. A final set of analyses suggested that impaired olfactory performance may aid detection of underlying Lewy body disease. The findings indicate that Lewy body disease impairs late life olfactory function even in otherwise asymptomatic individuals. SN - 1464-3553 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21257733/Lewy_bodies_and_olfactory_dysfunction_in_old_age_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/chemse/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/chemse/bjq139 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -