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Coffee consumption and reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: findings from the Singapore Chinese Health Study.
Cancer Causes Control 2011; 22(3):503-10CC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Coffee consumption has been associated with reduced markers of hepatic cell damage, reduced risk of chronic liver disease, and cirrhosis across a variety of populations. Data on the association between coffee consumption and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), especially in high-risk populations, are sparse.

METHODS

This study examines the relationship between coffee and caffeine consumption, and the risk of developing HCC within the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort of 63,257 middle-aged and older Chinese men and women, a relatively high-risk population for HCC. Baseline data on coffee consumption and other dietary and lifestyle factors were collected through in-person interviews at enrollment between 1993 and 1998.

RESULTS

As of 31 December 2006, 362 cohort participants had developed HCC. High levels of coffee or caffeine consumption were associated with reduced risk of HCC (p for trend < 0.05). Compared with non-drinkers of coffee, individuals who consumed three or more cups of coffee per day experienced a statistically significant 44% reduction in risk of HCC (hazard ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval, 0.31-1.00, p = .049) after adjustment for potential confounders and tea consumption.

CONCLUSION

These data suggest that coffee consumption may reduce the risk of developing HCC in Chinese in Singapore.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Masonic Cancer Center, MMC 806, University of Minnesota, 425 East River Road, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21258859

Citation

Johnson, Shane, et al. "Coffee Consumption and Reduced Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Findings From the Singapore Chinese Health Study." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 22, no. 3, 2011, pp. 503-10.
Johnson S, Koh WP, Wang R, et al. Coffee consumption and reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: findings from the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Cancer Causes Control. 2011;22(3):503-10.
Johnson, S., Koh, W. P., Wang, R., Govindarajan, S., Yu, M. C., & Yuan, J. M. (2011). Coffee consumption and reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: findings from the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 22(3), pp. 503-10. doi:10.1007/s10552-010-9725-0.
Johnson S, et al. Coffee Consumption and Reduced Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Findings From the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Cancer Causes Control. 2011;22(3):503-10. PubMed PMID: 21258859.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee consumption and reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: findings from the Singapore Chinese Health Study. AU - Johnson,Shane, AU - Koh,Woon-Puay, AU - Wang,Renwei, AU - Govindarajan,Sugantha, AU - Yu,Mimi C, AU - Yuan,Jian-Min, Y1 - 2011/01/22/ PY - 2010/08/06/received PY - 2010/12/29/accepted PY - 2011/1/25/entrez PY - 2011/1/25/pubmed PY - 2011/6/3/medline SP - 503 EP - 10 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 22 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Coffee consumption has been associated with reduced markers of hepatic cell damage, reduced risk of chronic liver disease, and cirrhosis across a variety of populations. Data on the association between coffee consumption and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), especially in high-risk populations, are sparse. METHODS: This study examines the relationship between coffee and caffeine consumption, and the risk of developing HCC within the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort of 63,257 middle-aged and older Chinese men and women, a relatively high-risk population for HCC. Baseline data on coffee consumption and other dietary and lifestyle factors were collected through in-person interviews at enrollment between 1993 and 1998. RESULTS: As of 31 December 2006, 362 cohort participants had developed HCC. High levels of coffee or caffeine consumption were associated with reduced risk of HCC (p for trend < 0.05). Compared with non-drinkers of coffee, individuals who consumed three or more cups of coffee per day experienced a statistically significant 44% reduction in risk of HCC (hazard ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval, 0.31-1.00, p = .049) after adjustment for potential confounders and tea consumption. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that coffee consumption may reduce the risk of developing HCC in Chinese in Singapore. SN - 1573-7225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21258859/Coffee_consumption_and_reduced_risk_of_hepatocellular_carcinoma:_findings_from_the_Singapore_Chinese_Health_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-010-9725-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -