Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Advanced glycation end-products, a pathophysiological pathway in the cardiorenal syndrome.

Abstract

The prevalence of heart failure (HF) is increasing. A distinction is made between diastolic HF (preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)) and systolic HF (reduced LVEF). Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are crystallized proteins that accumulate during ageing, but are particularly increased in patients with diabetes mellitus and in patients with renal failure. Through the formation of collagen crosslinks, and by interaction with the AGE-receptor, which impairs calcium handling and increases fibrosis, AGE-accumulation has pathophysiologically been associated with the development of diastolic and renal dysfunction. Interestingly, diastolic dysfunction is a frequent finding in elderly patients, diabetic patients and in patients with renal failure. Taken together, this suggests that AGEs are related to the development and progression of diastolic HF and renal failure. In this review, the role of AGEs as a possible pathophysiological factor that link the development and progression of heart and renal failure, is discussed. Finally, the role of AGE intervention as a possible treatment in HF patients will be discussed.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 30.001, 9700, RB, Groningen, The Netherlands.

    , , ,

    Source

    Heart failure reviews 17:2 2012 Mar pg 221-8

    MeSH

    Cardio-Renal Syndrome
    Chronic Disease
    Glycation End Products, Advanced
    Heart
    Heart Failure, Diastolic
    Humans
    Kidney
    Renal Insufficiency

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21259070

    Citation

    Willemsen, Suzan, et al. "Advanced Glycation End-products, a Pathophysiological Pathway in the Cardiorenal Syndrome." Heart Failure Reviews, vol. 17, no. 2, 2012, pp. 221-8.
    Willemsen S, Hartog JW, Heiner-Fokkema MR, et al. Advanced glycation end-products, a pathophysiological pathway in the cardiorenal syndrome. Heart Fail Rev. 2012;17(2):221-8.
    Willemsen, S., Hartog, J. W., Heiner-Fokkema, M. R., van Veldhuisen, D. J., & Voors, A. A. (2012). Advanced glycation end-products, a pathophysiological pathway in the cardiorenal syndrome. Heart Failure Reviews, 17(2), pp. 221-8. doi:10.1007/s10741-010-9225-z.
    Willemsen S, et al. Advanced Glycation End-products, a Pathophysiological Pathway in the Cardiorenal Syndrome. Heart Fail Rev. 2012;17(2):221-8. PubMed PMID: 21259070.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Advanced glycation end-products, a pathophysiological pathway in the cardiorenal syndrome. AU - Willemsen,Suzan, AU - Hartog,Jasper W L, AU - Heiner-Fokkema,M Rebecca, AU - van Veldhuisen,Dirk J, AU - Voors,Adriaan A, PY - 2011/1/25/entrez PY - 2011/1/25/pubmed PY - 2013/3/30/medline SP - 221 EP - 8 JF - Heart failure reviews JO - Heart Fail Rev VL - 17 IS - 2 N2 - The prevalence of heart failure (HF) is increasing. A distinction is made between diastolic HF (preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)) and systolic HF (reduced LVEF). Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are crystallized proteins that accumulate during ageing, but are particularly increased in patients with diabetes mellitus and in patients with renal failure. Through the formation of collagen crosslinks, and by interaction with the AGE-receptor, which impairs calcium handling and increases fibrosis, AGE-accumulation has pathophysiologically been associated with the development of diastolic and renal dysfunction. Interestingly, diastolic dysfunction is a frequent finding in elderly patients, diabetic patients and in patients with renal failure. Taken together, this suggests that AGEs are related to the development and progression of diastolic HF and renal failure. In this review, the role of AGEs as a possible pathophysiological factor that link the development and progression of heart and renal failure, is discussed. Finally, the role of AGE intervention as a possible treatment in HF patients will be discussed. SN - 1573-7322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21259070/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10741-010-9225-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -