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Perception of emotional expression in musical performance.
J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 2011 Jun; 37(3):921-34.JE

Abstract

Expression in musical performance is largely communicated by the manner in which a piece is played; interpretive aspects that supplement the written score. In piano performance, timing and amplitude are the principal parameters the performer can vary. We examined the way in which such variation serves to communicate emotion by manipulating timing and amplitude in performances of classical piano pieces. Over three experiments, listeners rated the emotional expressivity of performances and their manipulated versions. In Experiments 1 and 2, timing and amplitude information were covaried; judgments were monotonically decreasing with performance variability, demonstrating that the rank ordering of acoustical manipulations was captured by participants' responses. Further, participants' judgments formed an S-shaped (sigmoidal) function in which greater sensitivity was seen for musical manipulations in the middle of the range than at the extremes. In Experiment 3, timing and amplitude were manipulated independently; timing variation was found to provide more expressive information than did amplitude. Across all three experiments, listeners demonstrated sensitivity to the expressive cues we manipulated, with sensitivity increasing as a function of musical experience.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, McGill University, Canada. anjali.bhatara@mail.mcgill.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21261418

Citation

Bhatara, Anjali, et al. "Perception of Emotional Expression in Musical Performance." Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance, vol. 37, no. 3, 2011, pp. 921-34.
Bhatara A, Tirovolas AK, Duan LM, et al. Perception of emotional expression in musical performance. J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 2011;37(3):921-34.
Bhatara, A., Tirovolas, A. K., Duan, L. M., Levy, B., & Levitin, D. J. (2011). Perception of emotional expression in musical performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance, 37(3), 921-34. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0021922
Bhatara A, et al. Perception of Emotional Expression in Musical Performance. J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 2011;37(3):921-34. PubMed PMID: 21261418.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perception of emotional expression in musical performance. AU - Bhatara,Anjali, AU - Tirovolas,Anna K, AU - Duan,Lilu Marie, AU - Levy,Bianca, AU - Levitin,Daniel J, PY - 2011/1/26/entrez PY - 2011/1/26/pubmed PY - 2011/12/13/medline SP - 921 EP - 34 JF - Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance JO - J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform VL - 37 IS - 3 N2 - Expression in musical performance is largely communicated by the manner in which a piece is played; interpretive aspects that supplement the written score. In piano performance, timing and amplitude are the principal parameters the performer can vary. We examined the way in which such variation serves to communicate emotion by manipulating timing and amplitude in performances of classical piano pieces. Over three experiments, listeners rated the emotional expressivity of performances and their manipulated versions. In Experiments 1 and 2, timing and amplitude information were covaried; judgments were monotonically decreasing with performance variability, demonstrating that the rank ordering of acoustical manipulations was captured by participants' responses. Further, participants' judgments formed an S-shaped (sigmoidal) function in which greater sensitivity was seen for musical manipulations in the middle of the range than at the extremes. In Experiment 3, timing and amplitude were manipulated independently; timing variation was found to provide more expressive information than did amplitude. Across all three experiments, listeners demonstrated sensitivity to the expressive cues we manipulated, with sensitivity increasing as a function of musical experience. SN - 1939-1277 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21261418/Perception_of_emotional_expression_in_musical_performance_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/xhp/37/3/921 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -