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Nucleus accumbens dopamine and mu-opioid receptors modulate the reinstatement of food-seeking behavior by food-associated cues.
Behav Brain Res. 2011 Jun 01; 219(2):265-72.BB

Abstract

The high attrition rates for dietary interventions aimed at promoting a healthier body mass may be caused, at least in part, by constant exposure to environmental stimuli that are associated with palatable foods. In both humans and animals, conditioned stimuli (CSs) that signal reward availability reliably reinstate food- and drug-seeking behaviors. The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) is critically involved in the cue-evoked reinstatement of food-seeking, but the role of individual neurotransmitter systems within the NAcc remains to be determined. These experiments tested the effects of intra-accumbal pharmacological manipulations of dopamine (DA) D(1) and D(2) receptors, mu-opioid receptors, or serotonin (5-HT) receptors on cue-evoked relapse to food-seeking. Rats were trained to lever press for sucrose pellets and the concurrent presentation of a light-tone CS. Once training was complete, lever-pressing was extinguished in the absence of either sucrose or CS presentation. Once each rat had reached extinction criterion, they received two reinstatement sessions in which lever pressing was renewed by response-contingent presentation of the CS. Prior to each reinstatement test, rats received NAcc microinfusions of saline or the selective D(1) receptor antagonist SCH 23390, the D(2) receptor antagonist raclopride, the mu-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO), or 5-HT hydrogen maleate. Compared to saline test days, intra-accumbens infusions of SCH 23390 (1 μg/0.5 μL), raclopride (1 μg/0.5 μL), or DAMGO (0.25 μg/0.5 μL) effectively blocked the cue-evoked reinstatement of food-seeking. In contrast, stimulation of serotonin (5-HT) receptors by 5-HT hydrogen maleate (5 μg/0.5 μL) had no effect on cue-induced reinstatement. These novel data support roles for NAcc DA D(1), D(2), and mu-opioid receptors in the cue-evoked reinstatement of food seeking.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109, United States.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21262268

Citation

Guy, Elizabeth G., et al. "Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine and Mu-opioid Receptors Modulate the Reinstatement of Food-seeking Behavior By Food-associated Cues." Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 219, no. 2, 2011, pp. 265-72.
Guy EG, Choi E, Pratt WE. Nucleus accumbens dopamine and mu-opioid receptors modulate the reinstatement of food-seeking behavior by food-associated cues. Behav Brain Res. 2011;219(2):265-72.
Guy, E. G., Choi, E., & Pratt, W. E. (2011). Nucleus accumbens dopamine and mu-opioid receptors modulate the reinstatement of food-seeking behavior by food-associated cues. Behavioural Brain Research, 219(2), 265-72. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2011.01.024
Guy EG, Choi E, Pratt WE. Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine and Mu-opioid Receptors Modulate the Reinstatement of Food-seeking Behavior By Food-associated Cues. Behav Brain Res. 2011 Jun 1;219(2):265-72. PubMed PMID: 21262268.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nucleus accumbens dopamine and mu-opioid receptors modulate the reinstatement of food-seeking behavior by food-associated cues. AU - Guy,Elizabeth G, AU - Choi,Eugene, AU - Pratt,Wayne E, Y1 - 2011/01/22/ PY - 2010/10/05/received PY - 2011/01/12/revised PY - 2011/01/13/accepted PY - 2011/1/26/entrez PY - 2011/1/26/pubmed PY - 2011/7/14/medline SP - 265 EP - 72 JF - Behavioural brain research JO - Behav Brain Res VL - 219 IS - 2 N2 - The high attrition rates for dietary interventions aimed at promoting a healthier body mass may be caused, at least in part, by constant exposure to environmental stimuli that are associated with palatable foods. In both humans and animals, conditioned stimuli (CSs) that signal reward availability reliably reinstate food- and drug-seeking behaviors. The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) is critically involved in the cue-evoked reinstatement of food-seeking, but the role of individual neurotransmitter systems within the NAcc remains to be determined. These experiments tested the effects of intra-accumbal pharmacological manipulations of dopamine (DA) D(1) and D(2) receptors, mu-opioid receptors, or serotonin (5-HT) receptors on cue-evoked relapse to food-seeking. Rats were trained to lever press for sucrose pellets and the concurrent presentation of a light-tone CS. Once training was complete, lever-pressing was extinguished in the absence of either sucrose or CS presentation. Once each rat had reached extinction criterion, they received two reinstatement sessions in which lever pressing was renewed by response-contingent presentation of the CS. Prior to each reinstatement test, rats received NAcc microinfusions of saline or the selective D(1) receptor antagonist SCH 23390, the D(2) receptor antagonist raclopride, the mu-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO), or 5-HT hydrogen maleate. Compared to saline test days, intra-accumbens infusions of SCH 23390 (1 μg/0.5 μL), raclopride (1 μg/0.5 μL), or DAMGO (0.25 μg/0.5 μL) effectively blocked the cue-evoked reinstatement of food-seeking. In contrast, stimulation of serotonin (5-HT) receptors by 5-HT hydrogen maleate (5 μg/0.5 μL) had no effect on cue-induced reinstatement. These novel data support roles for NAcc DA D(1), D(2), and mu-opioid receptors in the cue-evoked reinstatement of food seeking. SN - 1872-7549 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21262268/Nucleus_accumbens_dopamine_and_mu_opioid_receptors_modulate_the_reinstatement_of_food_seeking_behavior_by_food_associated_cues_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0166-4328(11)00050-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -