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Maternal fish consumption, fetal growth and the risks of neonatal complications: the Generation R Study.
Br J Nutr. 2011 Mar; 105(6):938-49.BJ

Abstract

Maternal fish consumption during pregnancy has been suggested to affect birth outcomes. Previous studies mainly focused on birth outcomes and did not study fetal growth during pregnancy. In a prospective cohort study from early pregnancy onwards in The Netherlands, we assessed the associations of first-trimester maternal total-fish, lean-fish, fatty-fish and shellfish consumption with fetal growth characteristics in the second and third trimesters, growth characteristics at birth and the risks of neonatal complications, including pre-term birth, low birth weight and small for gestational age. In total, 3380 mothers completed a 293-item semi-quantitative FFQ to obtain information about fish consumption during the first trimester of pregnancy. Head circumference, femur length and fetal weight were estimated in the second and third trimesters by ultrasound. Information about birth anthropometrics and neonatal complications was available from hospital and midwife registries. Maternal older age, higher educational level, folic acid supplement use, alcohol use and not smoking were associated with higher fish consumption (P < 0·01). After adjustment, we observed no consistent associations of maternal total-fish consumption or specific consumption of lean fish, fatty fish or shellfish with fetal growth characteristics in the second and third trimesters and at birth. Likewise, total-fish consumption or specific consumption of any type of fish was not consistently associated with the risks of neonatal complications. These findings suggest that in a population with a relatively low fish intake, consumption of lean fish, fatty fish or shellfish in the first trimester is not associated with fetal growth or the risks of neonatal complications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Generation R Study Group (Room Ae-012), Erasmus Medical Centre, CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21266095

Citation

Heppe, Denise H M., et al. "Maternal Fish Consumption, Fetal Growth and the Risks of Neonatal Complications: the Generation R Study." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 105, no. 6, 2011, pp. 938-49.
Heppe DH, Steegers EA, Timmermans S, et al. Maternal fish consumption, fetal growth and the risks of neonatal complications: the Generation R Study. Br J Nutr. 2011;105(6):938-49.
Heppe, D. H., Steegers, E. A., Timmermans, S., Breeijen, H. d., Tiemeier, H., Hofman, A., & Jaddoe, V. W. (2011). Maternal fish consumption, fetal growth and the risks of neonatal complications: the Generation R Study. The British Journal of Nutrition, 105(6), 938-49. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114510004460
Heppe DH, et al. Maternal Fish Consumption, Fetal Growth and the Risks of Neonatal Complications: the Generation R Study. Br J Nutr. 2011;105(6):938-49. PubMed PMID: 21266095.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal fish consumption, fetal growth and the risks of neonatal complications: the Generation R Study. AU - Heppe,Denise H M, AU - Steegers,Eric A P, AU - Timmermans,Sarah, AU - Breeijen,Hanneke den, AU - Tiemeier,Henning, AU - Hofman,Albert, AU - Jaddoe,Vincent W V, Y1 - 2011/01/26/ PY - 2011/1/27/entrez PY - 2011/1/27/pubmed PY - 2011/5/12/medline SP - 938 EP - 49 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 105 IS - 6 N2 - Maternal fish consumption during pregnancy has been suggested to affect birth outcomes. Previous studies mainly focused on birth outcomes and did not study fetal growth during pregnancy. In a prospective cohort study from early pregnancy onwards in The Netherlands, we assessed the associations of first-trimester maternal total-fish, lean-fish, fatty-fish and shellfish consumption with fetal growth characteristics in the second and third trimesters, growth characteristics at birth and the risks of neonatal complications, including pre-term birth, low birth weight and small for gestational age. In total, 3380 mothers completed a 293-item semi-quantitative FFQ to obtain information about fish consumption during the first trimester of pregnancy. Head circumference, femur length and fetal weight were estimated in the second and third trimesters by ultrasound. Information about birth anthropometrics and neonatal complications was available from hospital and midwife registries. Maternal older age, higher educational level, folic acid supplement use, alcohol use and not smoking were associated with higher fish consumption (P < 0·01). After adjustment, we observed no consistent associations of maternal total-fish consumption or specific consumption of lean fish, fatty fish or shellfish with fetal growth characteristics in the second and third trimesters and at birth. Likewise, total-fish consumption or specific consumption of any type of fish was not consistently associated with the risks of neonatal complications. These findings suggest that in a population with a relatively low fish intake, consumption of lean fish, fatty fish or shellfish in the first trimester is not associated with fetal growth or the risks of neonatal complications. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21266095/Maternal_fish_consumption_fetal_growth_and_the_risks_of_neonatal_complications:_the_Generation_R_Study_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114510004460/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -