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Body mass index and adult weight gain among reproductive age women with migraine.
Headache 2011; 51(4):559-69H

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the cross-sectional relationship between migraine and pregravid obesity; and to assess the risk of adult weight gain among women with history of a pediatric diagnosis of migraine.

BACKGROUND

Obesity, comorbid with pain disorders including migraine, shares common pathophysiological characteristics including systemic inflammation, and derangements in adipose-tissue derived cytokines. Despite biochemical and epidemiological commonalities, obesity-migraine associations have been inconsistently observed.

METHODS

A cohort of 3733 women was interviewed during early pregnancy. We ascertained participants' self-reported history of physician-diagnosed migraine and collected self-reported information about pregravid weight, adult height, and net weight change from age 18 to the 3-months period before pregnancy. Using pregravid body mass index, we categorized participants as follows: lean (< 18.5 kg/m²), normal (18.5-24.9 kg/m²), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m²), obese (30-34.9 kg/m²), severely obese (35-39.9 kg/m²), and morbidly obese (≥ 40 kg/m²). Logistic regression procedures were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS

After adjusting for confounders, relative to normal weight women, obese women had a 1.48-fold increased odds of migraine (OR = 1.48; 95% CI 1.12-1.96). Severely obese (OR = 2.07; 95% CI 1.27-3.39) and morbidly obese (OR = 2.75; 95% CI 1.60-4.70) had the highest odds of migraines. Women with a history of diagnosed pediatric migraine had a 1.67-fold higher odds of gaining ≥ 10.0 kg above their weight at age 18, as compared with non-migraineurs (OR = 1.67; 95% CI 1.13-2.47).

CONCLUSION

These data support earlier observations of migraine-obesity association among women, and extend the literature to include evidence of adult weight gain among women with a history of pediatric migraine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21269300

Citation

Vo, Michelle, et al. "Body Mass Index and Adult Weight Gain Among Reproductive Age Women With Migraine." Headache, vol. 51, no. 4, 2011, pp. 559-69.
Vo M, Ainalem A, Qiu C, et al. Body mass index and adult weight gain among reproductive age women with migraine. Headache. 2011;51(4):559-69.
Vo, M., Ainalem, A., Qiu, C., Peterlin, B. L., Aurora, S. K., & Williams, M. A. (2011). Body mass index and adult weight gain among reproductive age women with migraine. Headache, 51(4), pp. 559-69. doi:10.1111/j.1526-4610.2010.01833.x.
Vo M, et al. Body Mass Index and Adult Weight Gain Among Reproductive Age Women With Migraine. Headache. 2011;51(4):559-69. PubMed PMID: 21269300.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index and adult weight gain among reproductive age women with migraine. AU - Vo,Michelle, AU - Ainalem,Abinnet, AU - Qiu,Chunfang, AU - Peterlin,B Lee, AU - Aurora,Sheena K, AU - Williams,Michelle A, Y1 - 2011/01/26/ PY - 2011/1/29/entrez PY - 2011/1/29/pubmed PY - 2013/8/2/medline SP - 559 EP - 69 JF - Headache JO - Headache VL - 51 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cross-sectional relationship between migraine and pregravid obesity; and to assess the risk of adult weight gain among women with history of a pediatric diagnosis of migraine. BACKGROUND: Obesity, comorbid with pain disorders including migraine, shares common pathophysiological characteristics including systemic inflammation, and derangements in adipose-tissue derived cytokines. Despite biochemical and epidemiological commonalities, obesity-migraine associations have been inconsistently observed. METHODS: A cohort of 3733 women was interviewed during early pregnancy. We ascertained participants' self-reported history of physician-diagnosed migraine and collected self-reported information about pregravid weight, adult height, and net weight change from age 18 to the 3-months period before pregnancy. Using pregravid body mass index, we categorized participants as follows: lean (< 18.5 kg/m²), normal (18.5-24.9 kg/m²), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m²), obese (30-34.9 kg/m²), severely obese (35-39.9 kg/m²), and morbidly obese (≥ 40 kg/m²). Logistic regression procedures were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: After adjusting for confounders, relative to normal weight women, obese women had a 1.48-fold increased odds of migraine (OR = 1.48; 95% CI 1.12-1.96). Severely obese (OR = 2.07; 95% CI 1.27-3.39) and morbidly obese (OR = 2.75; 95% CI 1.60-4.70) had the highest odds of migraines. Women with a history of diagnosed pediatric migraine had a 1.67-fold higher odds of gaining ≥ 10.0 kg above their weight at age 18, as compared with non-migraineurs (OR = 1.67; 95% CI 1.13-2.47). CONCLUSION: These data support earlier observations of migraine-obesity association among women, and extend the literature to include evidence of adult weight gain among women with a history of pediatric migraine. SN - 1526-4610 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21269300/Body_mass_index_and_adult_weight_gain_among_reproductive_age_women_with_migraine_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-4610.2010.01833.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -