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Alcohol and distraction interact to impair driving performance.
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011 Aug 01; 117(1):31-7.DA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recognition of the risks associated with alcohol intoxication and driver distraction has led to a wealth of simulated driving research aimed at studying the adverse effects of each of these factors. Research on driving has moved beyond the individual, separate examination of these factors to the examination of potential interactions between alcohol intoxication and driver distraction. In many driving situations, distractions are commonplace and might have little or no disruptive influence on primary driving functions. Yet, such distractions might become disruptive to a driver who is intoxicated.

METHODS

The present study examined the interactive impairing effects of alcohol intoxication and driver distraction on simulated driving performance in 40 young adult drivers using a divided attention task as a distracter activity. The interactive influence of alcohol and distraction was tested by having drivers perform the driving task under four different conditions: 0.65 g/kg alcohol; 0.65 g/kg alcohol+divided attention; placebo; and placebo+divided attention.

RESULTS

As hypothesized, divided attention had no impairing effect on driving performance in sober drivers. However, under alcohol, divided attention exacerbated the impairing effects of alcohol on driving precision.

CONCLUSIONS

Alcohol and distraction continue to be appropriate targets for research into ways to reduce the rates of driving-related fatalities and injuries. Greater consideration of how alcohol and distraction interact to impair aspects of driving performance can further efforts to create prevention and intervention measures to protect drivers, particularly young adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT 06519, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21277119

Citation

Harrison, Emily L R., and Mark T. Fillmore. "Alcohol and Distraction Interact to Impair Driving Performance." Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 117, no. 1, 2011, pp. 31-7.
Harrison EL, Fillmore MT. Alcohol and distraction interact to impair driving performance. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011;117(1):31-7.
Harrison, E. L., & Fillmore, M. T. (2011). Alcohol and distraction interact to impair driving performance. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 117(1), 31-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2011.01.002
Harrison EL, Fillmore MT. Alcohol and Distraction Interact to Impair Driving Performance. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011 Aug 1;117(1):31-7. PubMed PMID: 21277119.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol and distraction interact to impair driving performance. AU - Harrison,Emily L R, AU - Fillmore,Mark T, Y1 - 2011/01/28/ PY - 2010/09/10/received PY - 2011/01/08/revised PY - 2011/01/09/accepted PY - 2011/2/1/entrez PY - 2011/2/1/pubmed PY - 2012/1/18/medline SP - 31 EP - 7 JF - Drug and alcohol dependence JO - Drug Alcohol Depend VL - 117 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Recognition of the risks associated with alcohol intoxication and driver distraction has led to a wealth of simulated driving research aimed at studying the adverse effects of each of these factors. Research on driving has moved beyond the individual, separate examination of these factors to the examination of potential interactions between alcohol intoxication and driver distraction. In many driving situations, distractions are commonplace and might have little or no disruptive influence on primary driving functions. Yet, such distractions might become disruptive to a driver who is intoxicated. METHODS: The present study examined the interactive impairing effects of alcohol intoxication and driver distraction on simulated driving performance in 40 young adult drivers using a divided attention task as a distracter activity. The interactive influence of alcohol and distraction was tested by having drivers perform the driving task under four different conditions: 0.65 g/kg alcohol; 0.65 g/kg alcohol+divided attention; placebo; and placebo+divided attention. RESULTS: As hypothesized, divided attention had no impairing effect on driving performance in sober drivers. However, under alcohol, divided attention exacerbated the impairing effects of alcohol on driving precision. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol and distraction continue to be appropriate targets for research into ways to reduce the rates of driving-related fatalities and injuries. Greater consideration of how alcohol and distraction interact to impair aspects of driving performance can further efforts to create prevention and intervention measures to protect drivers, particularly young adults. SN - 1879-0046 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21277119/Alcohol_and_distraction_interact_to_impair_driving_performance_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-8716(11)00050-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -