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Acne vulgaris, probiotics and the gut-brain-skin axis - back to the future?
Gut Pathog. 2011 Jan 31; 3(1):1.GP

Abstract

Over 70 years have passed since dermatologists John H. Stokes and Donald M. Pillsbury first proposed a gastrointestinal mechanism for the overlap between depression, anxiety and skin conditions such as acne. Stokes and Pillsbury hypothesized that emotional states might alter the normal intestinal microflora, increase intestinal permeability and contribute to systemic inflammation. Among the remedies advocated by Stokes and Pillsbury were Lactobacillus acidophilus cultures. Many aspects of this gut-brain-skin unifying theory have recently been validated. The ability of the gut microbiota and oral probiotics to influence systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, glycemic control, tissue lipid content and even mood itself, may have important implications in acne. The intestinal microflora may also provide a twist to the developing diet and acne research. Here we provide a historical perspective to the contemporary investigations and clinical implications of the gut-brain-skin connection in acne.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, 11203, USA. wpbowe@gmail.com.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21281494

Citation

Bowe, Whitney P., and Alan C. Logan. "Acne Vulgaris, Probiotics and the Gut-brain-skin Axis - Back to the Future?" Gut Pathogens, vol. 3, no. 1, 2011, p. 1.
Bowe WP, Logan AC. Acne vulgaris, probiotics and the gut-brain-skin axis - back to the future? Gut Pathog. 2011;3(1):1.
Bowe, W. P., & Logan, A. C. (2011). Acne vulgaris, probiotics and the gut-brain-skin axis - back to the future? Gut Pathogens, 3(1), 1. https://doi.org/10.1186/1757-4749-3-1
Bowe WP, Logan AC. Acne Vulgaris, Probiotics and the Gut-brain-skin Axis - Back to the Future. Gut Pathog. 2011 Jan 31;3(1):1. PubMed PMID: 21281494.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acne vulgaris, probiotics and the gut-brain-skin axis - back to the future? AU - Bowe,Whitney P, AU - Logan,Alan C, Y1 - 2011/01/31/ PY - 2010/12/27/received PY - 2011/01/31/accepted PY - 2011/2/2/entrez PY - 2011/2/2/pubmed PY - 2011/2/2/medline SP - 1 EP - 1 JF - Gut pathogens JO - Gut Pathog VL - 3 IS - 1 N2 - Over 70 years have passed since dermatologists John H. Stokes and Donald M. Pillsbury first proposed a gastrointestinal mechanism for the overlap between depression, anxiety and skin conditions such as acne. Stokes and Pillsbury hypothesized that emotional states might alter the normal intestinal microflora, increase intestinal permeability and contribute to systemic inflammation. Among the remedies advocated by Stokes and Pillsbury were Lactobacillus acidophilus cultures. Many aspects of this gut-brain-skin unifying theory have recently been validated. The ability of the gut microbiota and oral probiotics to influence systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, glycemic control, tissue lipid content and even mood itself, may have important implications in acne. The intestinal microflora may also provide a twist to the developing diet and acne research. Here we provide a historical perspective to the contemporary investigations and clinical implications of the gut-brain-skin connection in acne. SN - 1757-4749 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21281494/Acne_vulgaris_probiotics_and_the_gut_brain_skin_axis___back_to_the_future L2 - https://gutpathogens.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1757-4749-3-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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