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Minimally invasive Oxford phase 3 unicompartmental knee replacement: results of 1000 cases.
J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2011 Feb; 93(2):198-204.JB

Abstract

This prospective study describes the outcome of the first 1000 phase 3 Oxford medial unicompartmental knee replacements (UKRs) implanted using a minimally invasive surgical approach for the recommended indications by two surgeons and followed up independently. The mean follow-up was 5.6 years (1 to 11) with 547 knees having a minimum follow-up of five years. At five years their mean Oxford knee score was 41.3 (sd 7.2), the mean American Knee Society Objective Score 86.4 (sd 13.4), mean American Knee Society Functional Score 86.1 (sd 16.6), mean Tegner activity score 2.8 (sd 1.1). For the entire cohort, the mean maximum flexion was 130° at the time of final review. The incidence of implant-related re-operations was 2.9%; of these 29 re-operations two were revisions requiring revision knee replacement components with stems and wedges, 17 were conversions to a primary total knee replacement, six were open reductions for dislocation of the bearing, three were secondary lateral UKRs and one was revision of a tibial component. The most common reason for further surgical intervention was progression of arthritis in the lateral compartment (0.9%), followed by dislocation of the bearing (0.6%) and revision for unexplained pain (0.6%). If all implant-related re-operations are considered failures, the ten-year survival rate was 96% (95% confidence interval, 92.5 to 99.5). If only revisions requiring revision components are considered failures the ten-year survival rate is 99.8% (confidence interval 99 to 100). This is the largest published series of UKRs implanted through a minimally invasive surgical approach and with ten-year survival data. The survival rates are similar to those obtained with a standard open approach whereas the function is better. This demonstrates the effectiveness and safety of a minimally invasive surgical approach for implanting the Oxford UKR.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, UK. hemant.pandit@ndorms.ox.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21282759

Citation

Pandit, H, et al. "Minimally Invasive Oxford Phase 3 Unicompartmental Knee Replacement: Results of 1000 Cases." The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. British Volume, vol. 93, no. 2, 2011, pp. 198-204.
Pandit H, Jenkins C, Gill HS, et al. Minimally invasive Oxford phase 3 unicompartmental knee replacement: results of 1000 cases. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2011;93(2):198-204.
Pandit, H., Jenkins, C., Gill, H. S., Barker, K., Dodd, C. A., & Murray, D. W. (2011). Minimally invasive Oxford phase 3 unicompartmental knee replacement: results of 1000 cases. The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. British Volume, 93(2), 198-204. https://doi.org/10.1302/0301-620X.93B2.25767
Pandit H, et al. Minimally Invasive Oxford Phase 3 Unicompartmental Knee Replacement: Results of 1000 Cases. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2011;93(2):198-204. PubMed PMID: 21282759.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Minimally invasive Oxford phase 3 unicompartmental knee replacement: results of 1000 cases. AU - Pandit,H, AU - Jenkins,C, AU - Gill,H S, AU - Barker,K, AU - Dodd,C A F, AU - Murray,D W, PY - 2011/2/2/entrez PY - 2011/2/2/pubmed PY - 2011/3/15/medline SP - 198 EP - 204 JF - The Journal of bone and joint surgery. British volume JO - J Bone Joint Surg Br VL - 93 IS - 2 N2 - This prospective study describes the outcome of the first 1000 phase 3 Oxford medial unicompartmental knee replacements (UKRs) implanted using a minimally invasive surgical approach for the recommended indications by two surgeons and followed up independently. The mean follow-up was 5.6 years (1 to 11) with 547 knees having a minimum follow-up of five years. At five years their mean Oxford knee score was 41.3 (sd 7.2), the mean American Knee Society Objective Score 86.4 (sd 13.4), mean American Knee Society Functional Score 86.1 (sd 16.6), mean Tegner activity score 2.8 (sd 1.1). For the entire cohort, the mean maximum flexion was 130° at the time of final review. The incidence of implant-related re-operations was 2.9%; of these 29 re-operations two were revisions requiring revision knee replacement components with stems and wedges, 17 were conversions to a primary total knee replacement, six were open reductions for dislocation of the bearing, three were secondary lateral UKRs and one was revision of a tibial component. The most common reason for further surgical intervention was progression of arthritis in the lateral compartment (0.9%), followed by dislocation of the bearing (0.6%) and revision for unexplained pain (0.6%). If all implant-related re-operations are considered failures, the ten-year survival rate was 96% (95% confidence interval, 92.5 to 99.5). If only revisions requiring revision components are considered failures the ten-year survival rate is 99.8% (confidence interval 99 to 100). This is the largest published series of UKRs implanted through a minimally invasive surgical approach and with ten-year survival data. The survival rates are similar to those obtained with a standard open approach whereas the function is better. This demonstrates the effectiveness and safety of a minimally invasive surgical approach for implanting the Oxford UKR. SN - 2044-5377 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21282759/Minimally_invasive_Oxford_phase_3_unicompartmental_knee_replacement:_results_of_1000_cases_ L2 - https://online.boneandjoint.org.uk/doi/full/10.1302/0301-620X.93B2.25767 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -