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No effect of time of day at presentation to the emergency department on the outcome of patients who are admitted to the intensive care unit.
Emerg Med Australas. 2011 Feb; 23(1):33-8.EM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine if an association exists between the time of day when a patient presents to ED and their outcome for those admitted directly to the ICU.

METHODS

We performed a retrospective cohort study on all patients admitted to the ICU directly from the ED from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2008, using data from the ED and ICU databases in a single institution. Comparisons of mortality, length of stay in the ED, ICU, hospital and time on a ventilator were made based on the time of presentation.

RESULTS

A total of 400 patients were admitted to ICU from the ED. There was no evidence of a difference in mortality between those presenting between midnight and 8 am, 8 am and 4 pm or 4 pm and midnight (23.2%, 22.8%, 19.5%, respectively, P= 0.71), or for those presenting during office hours (8 am-4 pm Monday to Friday) or outside office hours (26.1% and 20.2%, respectively, P= 0.23). There were no differences in time on a ventilator, or length of stay in ED, intensive care and hospital.

CONCLUSIONS

The time of day patients arrive at the ED has no association with length of stay in ED, intensive care or hospital, time on the ventilator, or mortality for those who are admitted to the ICU.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Emergency Department, St George Hospital, Gray Street, Kogarah, NSW 2217, Australia. stephen.asha@sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21284811

Citation

Asha, Stephen Edward, et al. "No Effect of Time of Day at Presentation to the Emergency Department On the Outcome of Patients Who Are Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit." Emergency Medicine Australasia : EMA, vol. 23, no. 1, 2011, pp. 33-8.
Asha SE, Titmuss K, Black D. No effect of time of day at presentation to the emergency department on the outcome of patients who are admitted to the intensive care unit. Emerg Med Australas. 2011;23(1):33-8.
Asha, S. E., Titmuss, K., & Black, D. (2011). No effect of time of day at presentation to the emergency department on the outcome of patients who are admitted to the intensive care unit. Emergency Medicine Australasia : EMA, 23(1), 33-8. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1742-6723.2010.01371.x
Asha SE, Titmuss K, Black D. No Effect of Time of Day at Presentation to the Emergency Department On the Outcome of Patients Who Are Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit. Emerg Med Australas. 2011;23(1):33-8. PubMed PMID: 21284811.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - No effect of time of day at presentation to the emergency department on the outcome of patients who are admitted to the intensive care unit. AU - Asha,Stephen Edward, AU - Titmuss,Kathryn, AU - Black,Deborah, Y1 - 2011/01/20/ PY - 2011/2/3/entrez PY - 2011/2/3/pubmed PY - 2012/5/18/medline SP - 33 EP - 8 JF - Emergency medicine Australasia : EMA JO - Emerg Med Australas VL - 23 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine if an association exists between the time of day when a patient presents to ED and their outcome for those admitted directly to the ICU. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study on all patients admitted to the ICU directly from the ED from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2008, using data from the ED and ICU databases in a single institution. Comparisons of mortality, length of stay in the ED, ICU, hospital and time on a ventilator were made based on the time of presentation. RESULTS: A total of 400 patients were admitted to ICU from the ED. There was no evidence of a difference in mortality between those presenting between midnight and 8 am, 8 am and 4 pm or 4 pm and midnight (23.2%, 22.8%, 19.5%, respectively, P= 0.71), or for those presenting during office hours (8 am-4 pm Monday to Friday) or outside office hours (26.1% and 20.2%, respectively, P= 0.23). There were no differences in time on a ventilator, or length of stay in ED, intensive care and hospital. CONCLUSIONS: The time of day patients arrive at the ED has no association with length of stay in ED, intensive care or hospital, time on the ventilator, or mortality for those who are admitted to the ICU. SN - 1742-6723 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21284811/No_effect_of_time_of_day_at_presentation_to_the_emergency_department_on_the_outcome_of_patients_who_are_admitted_to_the_intensive_care_unit_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1742-6723.2010.01371.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -