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Mercury distribution and transport across the ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere interface in the Arctic Ocean.
Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Mar 01; 45(5):1866-72.ES

Abstract

The Arctic sea-ice environment has been undergoing dramatic changes in the past decades; to which extent this will affect the deposition, fate, and effects of chemical contaminants remains virtually unknown. Here, we report the first study on the distribution and transport of mercury (Hg) across the ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere interface in the Southern Beaufort Sea of the Arctic Ocean. Despite being sampled at different sites under various atmospheric and snow cover conditions, Hg concentrations in first-year ice cores were generally low and varied within a remarkably narrow range (0.5-4 ng L(-1)), with the highest concentration always in the surface granular ice layer which is characterized by enriched particle and brine pocket concentration. Atmospheric Hg depletion events appeared not to be an important factor in determining Hg concentrations in sea ice except for frost flowers and in the melt season when snowpack Hg leaches into the sea ice. The multiyear ice core showed a unique cyclic feature in the Hg profile with multiple peaks potentially corresponding to each ice growing/melting season. The highest Hg concentrations (up to 70 ng L(-1)) were found in sea-ice brine and decrease as the melt season progresses. As brine is the primary habitat for microbial communities responsible for sustaining the food web in the Arctic Ocean, the high and seasonally changing Hg concentrations in brine and its potential transformation may have a major impact on Hg uptake in Arctic marine ecosystems under a changing climate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environment and Geography, University of Manitoba, Center for Earth Observation Science, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21288021

Citation

Chaulk, Amanda, et al. "Mercury Distribution and Transport Across the Ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere Interface in the Arctic Ocean." Environmental Science & Technology, vol. 45, no. 5, 2011, pp. 1866-72.
Chaulk A, Stern GA, Armstrong D, et al. Mercury distribution and transport across the ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere interface in the Arctic Ocean. Environ Sci Technol. 2011;45(5):1866-72.
Chaulk, A., Stern, G. A., Armstrong, D., Barber, D. G., & Wang, F. (2011). Mercury distribution and transport across the ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere interface in the Arctic Ocean. Environmental Science & Technology, 45(5), 1866-72. https://doi.org/10.1021/es103434c
Chaulk A, et al. Mercury Distribution and Transport Across the Ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere Interface in the Arctic Ocean. Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Mar 1;45(5):1866-72. PubMed PMID: 21288021.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mercury distribution and transport across the ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere interface in the Arctic Ocean. AU - Chaulk,Amanda, AU - Stern,Gary A, AU - Armstrong,Debbie, AU - Barber,David G, AU - Wang,Feiyue, Y1 - 2011/02/02/ PY - 2011/2/4/entrez PY - 2011/2/4/pubmed PY - 2011/6/7/medline SP - 1866 EP - 72 JF - Environmental science & technology JO - Environ Sci Technol VL - 45 IS - 5 N2 - The Arctic sea-ice environment has been undergoing dramatic changes in the past decades; to which extent this will affect the deposition, fate, and effects of chemical contaminants remains virtually unknown. Here, we report the first study on the distribution and transport of mercury (Hg) across the ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere interface in the Southern Beaufort Sea of the Arctic Ocean. Despite being sampled at different sites under various atmospheric and snow cover conditions, Hg concentrations in first-year ice cores were generally low and varied within a remarkably narrow range (0.5-4 ng L(-1)), with the highest concentration always in the surface granular ice layer which is characterized by enriched particle and brine pocket concentration. Atmospheric Hg depletion events appeared not to be an important factor in determining Hg concentrations in sea ice except for frost flowers and in the melt season when snowpack Hg leaches into the sea ice. The multiyear ice core showed a unique cyclic feature in the Hg profile with multiple peaks potentially corresponding to each ice growing/melting season. The highest Hg concentrations (up to 70 ng L(-1)) were found in sea-ice brine and decrease as the melt season progresses. As brine is the primary habitat for microbial communities responsible for sustaining the food web in the Arctic Ocean, the high and seasonally changing Hg concentrations in brine and its potential transformation may have a major impact on Hg uptake in Arctic marine ecosystems under a changing climate. SN - 1520-5851 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21288021/Mercury_distribution_and_transport_across_the_ocean_sea_ice_atmosphere_interface_in_the_Arctic_Ocean_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/es103434c DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -