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Dental fear and alexithymia among adults in Finland.
Acta Odontol Scand. 2011 Jul; 69(4):243-7.AO

Abstract

population sample, controlling for age, gender, education and marital status as well as depressive and anxiety disorders. An additional aim was to evaluate whether gender modified this association. MATERIAL AND

METHODS.

The two-stage stratified cluster sample (n = 8028) represented the Finnish population aged 30 years and older. Participants (n = 5241) answered the question 'How afraid are you of visiting a dentist?' They also filled out the 20-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), which included three sub-scales, i.e. difficulties in identifying feelings (DIF), difficulties in describing feelings (DDF) and externally oriented thinking (EOT). Anxiety and depressive disorders were assessed with a standardized structured psychiatric interview according to DSM-IV criteria. To evaluate the association between dental fear and alexithymia, multiple logistic regression analyses were performed, adjusting simultaneously for the effects of possible confounding variables.

RESULTS.

Gender modified the association between dental fear and alexithymia. Among women, those reporting higher scores for TAS-20, DIF and EOT sub-scale scores were more likely to have high dental fear than were those reporting lower scores. Among men no such association was observed. Those participants who reported high DDF sub-scale scores were more likely to have high dental fear than were those reporting lower scores.

CONCLUSIONS.

Alexithymics are more likely to have high dental fear than non-alexithymics are. The findings support the suggestion that some people with dental fear may have internal personality vulnerability to anxiety disorders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21294672

Citation

Pohjola, Vesa, et al. "Dental Fear and Alexithymia Among Adults in Finland." Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, vol. 69, no. 4, 2011, pp. 243-7.
Pohjola V, Mattila AK, Joukamaa M, et al. Dental fear and alexithymia among adults in Finland. Acta Odontol Scand. 2011;69(4):243-7.
Pohjola, V., Mattila, A. K., Joukamaa, M., & Lahti, S. (2011). Dental fear and alexithymia among adults in Finland. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, 69(4), 243-7. https://doi.org/10.3109/00016357.2011.554861
Pohjola V, et al. Dental Fear and Alexithymia Among Adults in Finland. Acta Odontol Scand. 2011;69(4):243-7. PubMed PMID: 21294672.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dental fear and alexithymia among adults in Finland. AU - Pohjola,Vesa, AU - Mattila,Aino K, AU - Joukamaa,Matti, AU - Lahti,Satu, Y1 - 2011/02/07/ PY - 2011/2/8/entrez PY - 2011/2/8/pubmed PY - 2011/11/2/medline SP - 243 EP - 7 JF - Acta odontologica Scandinavica JO - Acta Odontol. Scand. VL - 69 IS - 4 N2 - population sample, controlling for age, gender, education and marital status as well as depressive and anxiety disorders. An additional aim was to evaluate whether gender modified this association. MATERIAL AND METHODS. The two-stage stratified cluster sample (n = 8028) represented the Finnish population aged 30 years and older. Participants (n = 5241) answered the question 'How afraid are you of visiting a dentist?' They also filled out the 20-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), which included three sub-scales, i.e. difficulties in identifying feelings (DIF), difficulties in describing feelings (DDF) and externally oriented thinking (EOT). Anxiety and depressive disorders were assessed with a standardized structured psychiatric interview according to DSM-IV criteria. To evaluate the association between dental fear and alexithymia, multiple logistic regression analyses were performed, adjusting simultaneously for the effects of possible confounding variables. RESULTS. Gender modified the association between dental fear and alexithymia. Among women, those reporting higher scores for TAS-20, DIF and EOT sub-scale scores were more likely to have high dental fear than were those reporting lower scores. Among men no such association was observed. Those participants who reported high DDF sub-scale scores were more likely to have high dental fear than were those reporting lower scores. CONCLUSIONS. Alexithymics are more likely to have high dental fear than non-alexithymics are. The findings support the suggestion that some people with dental fear may have internal personality vulnerability to anxiety disorders. SN - 1502-3850 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21294672/Dental_fear_and_alexithymia_among_adults_in_Finland_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/00016357.2011.554861 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -