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Work gets unfair for the depressed: cross-lagged relations between organizational justice perceptions and depressive symptoms.
J Appl Psychol. 2011 May; 96(3):602-18.JA

Abstract

The organizational justice literature has consistently documented substantial correlations between organizational justice and employee depression. Existing theoretical literature suggests this relationship occurs because perceptions of organizational (in)justice lead to subsequent psychological health problems. Building on recent research on the affective nature of justice perceptions, in the present research we broaden this perspective by arguing there are also theoretical arguments for a reverse effect whereby psychological health problems influence perceptions of organizational justice. To contrast both theoretical perspectives, we test longitudinal lagged effects between organizational justice perceptions (i.e., distributive justice, interactional justice, interpersonal justice, informational justice, and procedural justice) and employee depressive symptoms using structural equation modeling. Analyses of 3 samples from different military contexts (N₁ = 625, N₂ = 134, N₃ = 550) revealed evidence of depressive symptoms leading to subsequent organizational justice perceptions. In contrast, the opposite effects of organizational justice perceptions on depressive symptoms were not significant for any of the justice dimensions. The findings have broad implications for theoretical perspectives on psychological health and organizational justice perceptions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

U.S. Army Medical Research Unit–Europe, Heidelberg, Germany. jlang@ukaachen.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21299270

Citation

Lang, Jessica, et al. "Work Gets Unfair for the Depressed: Cross-lagged Relations Between Organizational Justice Perceptions and Depressive Symptoms." The Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 96, no. 3, 2011, pp. 602-18.
Lang J, Bliese PD, Lang JW, et al. Work gets unfair for the depressed: cross-lagged relations between organizational justice perceptions and depressive symptoms. J Appl Psychol. 2011;96(3):602-18.
Lang, J., Bliese, P. D., Lang, J. W., & Adler, A. B. (2011). Work gets unfair for the depressed: cross-lagged relations between organizational justice perceptions and depressive symptoms. The Journal of Applied Psychology, 96(3), 602-18. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0022463
Lang J, et al. Work Gets Unfair for the Depressed: Cross-lagged Relations Between Organizational Justice Perceptions and Depressive Symptoms. J Appl Psychol. 2011;96(3):602-18. PubMed PMID: 21299270.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Work gets unfair for the depressed: cross-lagged relations between organizational justice perceptions and depressive symptoms. AU - Lang,Jessica, AU - Bliese,Paul D, AU - Lang,Jonas W B, AU - Adler,Amy B, PY - 2011/2/9/entrez PY - 2011/2/9/pubmed PY - 2011/9/21/medline SP - 602 EP - 18 JF - The Journal of applied psychology JO - J Appl Psychol VL - 96 IS - 3 N2 - The organizational justice literature has consistently documented substantial correlations between organizational justice and employee depression. Existing theoretical literature suggests this relationship occurs because perceptions of organizational (in)justice lead to subsequent psychological health problems. Building on recent research on the affective nature of justice perceptions, in the present research we broaden this perspective by arguing there are also theoretical arguments for a reverse effect whereby psychological health problems influence perceptions of organizational justice. To contrast both theoretical perspectives, we test longitudinal lagged effects between organizational justice perceptions (i.e., distributive justice, interactional justice, interpersonal justice, informational justice, and procedural justice) and employee depressive symptoms using structural equation modeling. Analyses of 3 samples from different military contexts (N₁ = 625, N₂ = 134, N₃ = 550) revealed evidence of depressive symptoms leading to subsequent organizational justice perceptions. In contrast, the opposite effects of organizational justice perceptions on depressive symptoms were not significant for any of the justice dimensions. The findings have broad implications for theoretical perspectives on psychological health and organizational justice perceptions. SN - 1939-1854 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21299270/Work_gets_unfair_for_the_depressed:_cross_lagged_relations_between_organizational_justice_perceptions_and_depressive_symptoms_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/apl/96/3/602 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -