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The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile in Scotland.
J Infect. 2011 Apr; 62(4):271-9.JI

Abstract

The objective of this study was to characterise the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile in Scotland by determining the distribution of PCR ribotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility in 1613 isolates collected from all healthboard areas of Scotland in the period November 2007-December 2009. Three PCR ribotypes predominated amongst the Scottish isolates of C. difficile; ribotype 106 (29.4%), ribotype 001 (22%) and ribotype 027 (12.6%) followed by the less prevalent ribotypes including 002, 015, 014, 078, 005, 023 and 020. The distribution of ribotypes varied between healthboard areas. Ribotype 106 or 001 was the predominant ribotype in 10 healthboard areas, while ribotype 027 was the predominant type in two neighbouring areas. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of C. difficile isolates showed high frequencies of resistance to moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, erythromycin and cefotaxime in the epidemic C. difficile ribotypes 001, 027 and 106 compared to other less common ribotypes. Furthermore, reduced susceptibility to metronidazole was found only in the epidemic strains. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that fluoroquinolones, macrolides and cephalosporins may play a role in the spread of C. difficile in Scotland (while the role of metronidazole needs further investigations), and highlights the role of antimicrobial stewardship in preventing and controlling C. difficile infection (CDI).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Health Protection Scotland, Cadogan Square, Glasgow G27HF, Scotland, United Kingdom. camilla.wiuff@nhs.netNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21300104

Citation

Wiuff, Camilla, et al. "The Epidemiology of Clostridium Difficile in Scotland." The Journal of Infection, vol. 62, no. 4, 2011, pp. 271-9.
Wiuff C, Brown DJ, Mather H, et al. The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile in Scotland. J Infect. 2011;62(4):271-9.
Wiuff, C., Brown, D. J., Mather, H., Banks, A. L., Eastaway, A., & Coia, J. E. (2011). The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile in Scotland. The Journal of Infection, 62(4), 271-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jinf.2011.01.015
Wiuff C, et al. The Epidemiology of Clostridium Difficile in Scotland. J Infect. 2011;62(4):271-9. PubMed PMID: 21300104.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile in Scotland. AU - Wiuff,Camilla, AU - Brown,Derek J, AU - Mather,Henry, AU - Banks,A-Lan, AU - Eastaway,Anne, AU - Coia,John E, Y1 - 2011/02/22/ PY - 2010/08/27/received PY - 2011/01/28/revised PY - 2011/01/31/accepted PY - 2011/2/9/entrez PY - 2011/2/9/pubmed PY - 2011/7/21/medline SP - 271 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of infection JO - J Infect VL - 62 IS - 4 N2 - The objective of this study was to characterise the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile in Scotland by determining the distribution of PCR ribotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility in 1613 isolates collected from all healthboard areas of Scotland in the period November 2007-December 2009. Three PCR ribotypes predominated amongst the Scottish isolates of C. difficile; ribotype 106 (29.4%), ribotype 001 (22%) and ribotype 027 (12.6%) followed by the less prevalent ribotypes including 002, 015, 014, 078, 005, 023 and 020. The distribution of ribotypes varied between healthboard areas. Ribotype 106 or 001 was the predominant ribotype in 10 healthboard areas, while ribotype 027 was the predominant type in two neighbouring areas. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of C. difficile isolates showed high frequencies of resistance to moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, erythromycin and cefotaxime in the epidemic C. difficile ribotypes 001, 027 and 106 compared to other less common ribotypes. Furthermore, reduced susceptibility to metronidazole was found only in the epidemic strains. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that fluoroquinolones, macrolides and cephalosporins may play a role in the spread of C. difficile in Scotland (while the role of metronidazole needs further investigations), and highlights the role of antimicrobial stewardship in preventing and controlling C. difficile infection (CDI). SN - 1532-2742 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21300104/The_epidemiology_of_Clostridium_difficile_in_Scotland_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0163-4453(11)00033-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -