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The relative role of fibroblast growth factor 23 and parathyroid hormone in predicting future hypophosphatemia and hypercalcemia after living donor kidney transplantation: a 1-year prospective observational study.
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2011 Aug; 26(8):2691-5.ND

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Kidney transplantation (KTx) restores many of the disorders accompanying end-stage renal failure. However, hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia are both common complications after renal transplantation. Prospective observation of these complications has not been well described and pre-transplant predictors also remain unknown. This prospective observational cohort study was carried out to clarify pre-transplant risk factors of persistent hypophosphatemia and/or hypercalcemia at 12 months after transplantation.

METHODS

Consecutive living donor KTx recipients (n = 39) at Tokyo Women's Medical University were prospectively recruited. Parameters of bone and mineral metabolism including intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and full-length fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 23 were followed.

RESULTS

FGF23 decreased to comparable levels for renal function while hyperparathyroidism persisted at 12 months after transplantation. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that pre-transplant iPTH correlated with hypercalcemia at 12 months and pre-transplant FGF23 was the best pre-transplant predictor of persistent hypophosphatemia at 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS

It is intriguing that although FGF23 is not a causal factor for hypophosphatemia at 12 months post-transplantation, it is a significant predictor of this common complication.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. hirookawarazaki@yahoo.co.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21303965

Citation

Kawarazaki, Hiroo, et al. "The Relative Role of Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Parathyroid Hormone in Predicting Future Hypophosphatemia and Hypercalcemia After Living Donor Kidney Transplantation: a 1-year Prospective Observational Study." Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation : Official Publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association, vol. 26, no. 8, 2011, pp. 2691-5.
Kawarazaki H, Shibagaki Y, Fukumoto S, et al. The relative role of fibroblast growth factor 23 and parathyroid hormone in predicting future hypophosphatemia and hypercalcemia after living donor kidney transplantation: a 1-year prospective observational study. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2011;26(8):2691-5.
Kawarazaki, H., Shibagaki, Y., Fukumoto, S., Kido, R., Nakajima, I., Fuchinoue, S., Fujita, T., Fukagawa, M., & Teraoka, S. (2011). The relative role of fibroblast growth factor 23 and parathyroid hormone in predicting future hypophosphatemia and hypercalcemia after living donor kidney transplantation: a 1-year prospective observational study. Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation : Official Publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association, 26(8), 2691-5. https://doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfq777
Kawarazaki H, et al. The Relative Role of Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Parathyroid Hormone in Predicting Future Hypophosphatemia and Hypercalcemia After Living Donor Kidney Transplantation: a 1-year Prospective Observational Study. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2011;26(8):2691-5. PubMed PMID: 21303965.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relative role of fibroblast growth factor 23 and parathyroid hormone in predicting future hypophosphatemia and hypercalcemia after living donor kidney transplantation: a 1-year prospective observational study. AU - Kawarazaki,Hiroo, AU - Shibagaki,Yugo, AU - Fukumoto,Seiji, AU - Kido,Ryo, AU - Nakajima,Ichiro, AU - Fuchinoue,Shohei, AU - Fujita,Toshiro, AU - Fukagawa,Masafumi, AU - Teraoka,Satoshi, Y1 - 2011/02/08/ PY - 2011/2/10/entrez PY - 2011/2/10/pubmed PY - 2011/12/21/medline SP - 2691 EP - 5 JF - Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association JO - Nephrol Dial Transplant VL - 26 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Kidney transplantation (KTx) restores many of the disorders accompanying end-stage renal failure. However, hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia are both common complications after renal transplantation. Prospective observation of these complications has not been well described and pre-transplant predictors also remain unknown. This prospective observational cohort study was carried out to clarify pre-transplant risk factors of persistent hypophosphatemia and/or hypercalcemia at 12 months after transplantation. METHODS: Consecutive living donor KTx recipients (n = 39) at Tokyo Women's Medical University were prospectively recruited. Parameters of bone and mineral metabolism including intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and full-length fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 23 were followed. RESULTS: FGF23 decreased to comparable levels for renal function while hyperparathyroidism persisted at 12 months after transplantation. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that pre-transplant iPTH correlated with hypercalcemia at 12 months and pre-transplant FGF23 was the best pre-transplant predictor of persistent hypophosphatemia at 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: It is intriguing that although FGF23 is not a causal factor for hypophosphatemia at 12 months post-transplantation, it is a significant predictor of this common complication. SN - 1460-2385 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21303965/The_relative_role_of_fibroblast_growth_factor_23_and_parathyroid_hormone_in_predicting_future_hypophosphatemia_and_hypercalcemia_after_living_donor_kidney_transplantation:_a_1_year_prospective_observational_study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ndt/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ndt/gfq777 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -