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Cardiovascular risk factor variation within a Hispanic cohort: SWAN, the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation.
Ethn Dis. 2010 Autumn; 20(4):396-402.ED

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Hispanics have less favorable cardiovascular risk profiles relative to other groups, although little is known regarding variability in risk profiles according to country of origin. Our goal was to examine the association of cardiovascular risk factors with country of origin and acculturation in a cohort of middle-aged Hispanic women.

SETTING

Baseline data for participants at the New Jersey Site of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

PARTICIPANTS

419 women, aged 42-52 years, comprising 142 non-Hispanic Whites and 277 Hispanic: Central American (n = 29), South American (n = 106), Puerto Rican (n = 56), Dominican (n = 42) and Cuban (n = 44).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

BMI, smoking, blood pressure, lipid profiles, and presence of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes and metabolic syndrome were compared using univariate and multivariable models.

RESULTS

LDL and HDL varied significantly across Hispanic subgroups (overall P < or = .05). Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was greatest in Puerto Rican women (48.2% vs 40.0%, 35.0%, 13.9% and 29.3% in Central American, South American, Dominican and Cuban women, respectively, P = .016). Central American women were least likely to smoke (P < .05 vs Puerto Rican, Cuban and South American). Prevalence of hypertension and diabetes were similar across groups. Differences in lipids and metabolic syndrome were not explained by acculturation, financial strain, education, physical activity, smoking or dietary fat intake.

CONCLUSIONS

There is significant heterogeneity in cardiovascular risk status among middle-aged Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Central American and South American women, not explained by acculturation or socioeconomic indicators. These differences may be important for targeting screening and preventive interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine 1165 Morris Park Avenue, Rousso 336, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. carol.derby@einstein.yu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21305828

Citation

Derby, Carol A., et al. "Cardiovascular Risk Factor Variation Within a Hispanic Cohort: SWAN, the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation." Ethnicity & Disease, vol. 20, no. 4, 2010, pp. 396-402.
Derby CA, Wildman RP, McGinn AP, et al. Cardiovascular risk factor variation within a Hispanic cohort: SWAN, the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. Ethn Dis. 2010;20(4):396-402.
Derby, C. A., Wildman, R. P., McGinn, A. P., Green, R. R., Polotsky, A. J., Ram, K. T., Barnhart, J., Weiss, G., & Santoro, N. (2010). Cardiovascular risk factor variation within a Hispanic cohort: SWAN, the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. Ethnicity & Disease, 20(4), 396-402.
Derby CA, et al. Cardiovascular Risk Factor Variation Within a Hispanic Cohort: SWAN, the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. Ethn Dis. 2010;20(4):396-402. PubMed PMID: 21305828.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cardiovascular risk factor variation within a Hispanic cohort: SWAN, the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. AU - Derby,Carol A, AU - Wildman,Rachel P, AU - McGinn,Aileen P, AU - Green,Robin R, AU - Polotsky,Alex J, AU - Ram,Kavitha T, AU - Barnhart,Janice, AU - Weiss,Gerson, AU - Santoro,Nanette, PY - 2011/2/11/entrez PY - 2011/2/11/pubmed PY - 2011/3/19/medline SP - 396 EP - 402 JF - Ethnicity & disease JO - Ethn Dis VL - 20 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Hispanics have less favorable cardiovascular risk profiles relative to other groups, although little is known regarding variability in risk profiles according to country of origin. Our goal was to examine the association of cardiovascular risk factors with country of origin and acculturation in a cohort of middle-aged Hispanic women. SETTING: Baseline data for participants at the New Jersey Site of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN). PARTICIPANTS: 419 women, aged 42-52 years, comprising 142 non-Hispanic Whites and 277 Hispanic: Central American (n = 29), South American (n = 106), Puerto Rican (n = 56), Dominican (n = 42) and Cuban (n = 44). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: BMI, smoking, blood pressure, lipid profiles, and presence of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes and metabolic syndrome were compared using univariate and multivariable models. RESULTS: LDL and HDL varied significantly across Hispanic subgroups (overall P < or = .05). Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was greatest in Puerto Rican women (48.2% vs 40.0%, 35.0%, 13.9% and 29.3% in Central American, South American, Dominican and Cuban women, respectively, P = .016). Central American women were least likely to smoke (P < .05 vs Puerto Rican, Cuban and South American). Prevalence of hypertension and diabetes were similar across groups. Differences in lipids and metabolic syndrome were not explained by acculturation, financial strain, education, physical activity, smoking or dietary fat intake. CONCLUSIONS: There is significant heterogeneity in cardiovascular risk status among middle-aged Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Central American and South American women, not explained by acculturation or socioeconomic indicators. These differences may be important for targeting screening and preventive interventions. SN - 1049-510X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21305828/Cardiovascular_risk_factor_variation_within_a_Hispanic_cohort:_SWAN_the_Study_of_Women's_Health_Across_the_Nation_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/21305828/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -