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A high ratio of dietary n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer.
Nutr Res. 2011 Jan; 31(1):1-8.NR

Abstract

Experimental studies suggest omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) suppress and n-6 PUFA promote prostate tumor carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic evidence remains inconclusive. The objectives of this study were to examine the association between n-3 and n-6 PUFA and prostate cancer risk and determine if these associations differ by race or disease aggressiveness. We hypothesize that high intakes of n-3 and n-6 PUFA will be associated with lower and higher prostate cancer risk, respectively. A case-control study comprising 79 prostate cancer cases and 187 controls was conducted at the Durham VA Medical Center. Diet was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Logistic regression analyses were used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the associations between n-3 and n-6 PUFA intakes, the dietary ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids, and prostate cancer risk. Our results showed no significant associations between specific n-3 or n-6 PUFA intakes and prostate cancer risk. The highest dietary ratio of n-6/n-3 was significantly associated with elevated risk of high-grade (OR, 3.55; 95% CI, 1.18-10.69; P(trend) = 0.03), but not low-grade prostate cancer (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.43-2.17). In race-specific analyses, an increasing dietary ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids correlated with higher prostate cancer risk among white men (P(trend) = 0.05), but not black men. In conclusion, our findings suggest that a high dietary ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids may increase the risk of overall prostate cancer among white men and possibly increase the risk of high-grade prostate cancer among all men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. christina.williams@duke.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21310299

Citation

Williams, Christina D., et al. "A High Ratio of Dietary N-6/n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Is Associated With Increased Risk of Prostate Cancer." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 31, no. 1, 2011, pp. 1-8.
Williams CD, Whitley BM, Hoyo C, et al. A high ratio of dietary n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer. Nutr Res. 2011;31(1):1-8.
Williams, C. D., Whitley, B. M., Hoyo, C., Grant, D. J., Iraggi, J. D., Newman, K. A., Gerber, L., Taylor, L. A., McKeever, M. G., & Freedland, S. J. (2011). A high ratio of dietary n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 31(1), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2011.01.002
Williams CD, et al. A High Ratio of Dietary N-6/n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Is Associated With Increased Risk of Prostate Cancer. Nutr Res. 2011;31(1):1-8. PubMed PMID: 21310299.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A high ratio of dietary n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer. AU - Williams,Christina D, AU - Whitley,Brian M, AU - Hoyo,Cathrine, AU - Grant,Delores J, AU - Iraggi,Jared D, AU - Newman,Kathryn A, AU - Gerber,Leah, AU - Taylor,Loretta A, AU - McKeever,Madeline G, AU - Freedland,Stephen J, PY - 2010/08/17/received PY - 2010/12/28/revised PY - 2011/01/04/accepted PY - 2011/2/12/entrez PY - 2011/2/12/pubmed PY - 2011/5/21/medline SP - 1 EP - 8 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 31 IS - 1 N2 - Experimental studies suggest omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) suppress and n-6 PUFA promote prostate tumor carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic evidence remains inconclusive. The objectives of this study were to examine the association between n-3 and n-6 PUFA and prostate cancer risk and determine if these associations differ by race or disease aggressiveness. We hypothesize that high intakes of n-3 and n-6 PUFA will be associated with lower and higher prostate cancer risk, respectively. A case-control study comprising 79 prostate cancer cases and 187 controls was conducted at the Durham VA Medical Center. Diet was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Logistic regression analyses were used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the associations between n-3 and n-6 PUFA intakes, the dietary ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids, and prostate cancer risk. Our results showed no significant associations between specific n-3 or n-6 PUFA intakes and prostate cancer risk. The highest dietary ratio of n-6/n-3 was significantly associated with elevated risk of high-grade (OR, 3.55; 95% CI, 1.18-10.69; P(trend) = 0.03), but not low-grade prostate cancer (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.43-2.17). In race-specific analyses, an increasing dietary ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids correlated with higher prostate cancer risk among white men (P(trend) = 0.05), but not black men. In conclusion, our findings suggest that a high dietary ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids may increase the risk of overall prostate cancer among white men and possibly increase the risk of high-grade prostate cancer among all men. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21310299/A_high_ratio_of_dietary_n_6/n_3_polyunsaturated_fatty_acids_is_associated_with_increased_risk_of_prostate_cancer_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(11)00003-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -