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Gestational diabetes and subsequent growth patterns of offspring: the National Collaborative Perinatal Project.
Matern Child Health J. 2012 Jan; 16(1):125-32.MC

Abstract

Our objective was to test the hypothesis that intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes [GDM] predicts childhood growth independent of the effect on infant birthweight. We conducted a prospective analysis of 28,358 mother-infant pairs who enrolled in the National Collaborative Perinatal Project between 1959 and 1965. The offspring were followed until age 7. Four hundred and eighty-four mothers (1.7%) had GDM. The mean birthweight was 3.2 kg (range 1.1-5.6 kg). Maternal characteristics (age, education, race, family income, pre-pregnancy body mass index and pregnancy weight gain) and measures of childhood growth (birthweight, weight at ages 4, and 7) differed significantly by GDM status (all P < 0.05). As expected, compared to their non-diabetic counterparts, mothers with GDM gave birth to offspring that had higher weights at birth. The offspring of mothers with GDM were larger at age 7 as indicated by greater weight, BMI and BMI z-score compared to the offspring of mothers without GDM at that age (all P < 0.05). These differences at age 7 persisted even after adjustment for infant birthweight. Furthermore, the offspring of mothers with GDM had a 61% higher odds of being overweight at age 7 compared to the offspring of mothers without GDM after adjustment for maternal BMI, pregnancy weight gain, family income, race and birthweight [OR = 1.61 (95%CI:1.07, 1.28)]. Our results indicate that maternal GDM status is associated with offspring overweight status during childhood. This relationship is only partially mediated by effects on birthweight.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nursing, Penn State University, University Park, Hershey, PA 17033, USA. kab50@psu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21327952

Citation

Baptiste-Roberts, Kesha, et al. "Gestational Diabetes and Subsequent Growth Patterns of Offspring: the National Collaborative Perinatal Project." Maternal and Child Health Journal, vol. 16, no. 1, 2012, pp. 125-32.
Baptiste-Roberts K, Nicholson WK, Wang NY, et al. Gestational diabetes and subsequent growth patterns of offspring: the National Collaborative Perinatal Project. Matern Child Health J. 2012;16(1):125-32.
Baptiste-Roberts, K., Nicholson, W. K., Wang, N. Y., & Brancati, F. L. (2012). Gestational diabetes and subsequent growth patterns of offspring: the National Collaborative Perinatal Project. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 16(1), 125-32. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-011-0756-2
Baptiste-Roberts K, et al. Gestational Diabetes and Subsequent Growth Patterns of Offspring: the National Collaborative Perinatal Project. Matern Child Health J. 2012;16(1):125-32. PubMed PMID: 21327952.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gestational diabetes and subsequent growth patterns of offspring: the National Collaborative Perinatal Project. AU - Baptiste-Roberts,Kesha, AU - Nicholson,Wanda K, AU - Wang,Nae-Yuh, AU - Brancati,Frederick L, PY - 2011/2/18/entrez PY - 2011/2/18/pubmed PY - 2012/5/26/medline SP - 125 EP - 32 JF - Maternal and child health journal JO - Matern Child Health J VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - Our objective was to test the hypothesis that intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes [GDM] predicts childhood growth independent of the effect on infant birthweight. We conducted a prospective analysis of 28,358 mother-infant pairs who enrolled in the National Collaborative Perinatal Project between 1959 and 1965. The offspring were followed until age 7. Four hundred and eighty-four mothers (1.7%) had GDM. The mean birthweight was 3.2 kg (range 1.1-5.6 kg). Maternal characteristics (age, education, race, family income, pre-pregnancy body mass index and pregnancy weight gain) and measures of childhood growth (birthweight, weight at ages 4, and 7) differed significantly by GDM status (all P < 0.05). As expected, compared to their non-diabetic counterparts, mothers with GDM gave birth to offspring that had higher weights at birth. The offspring of mothers with GDM were larger at age 7 as indicated by greater weight, BMI and BMI z-score compared to the offspring of mothers without GDM at that age (all P < 0.05). These differences at age 7 persisted even after adjustment for infant birthweight. Furthermore, the offspring of mothers with GDM had a 61% higher odds of being overweight at age 7 compared to the offspring of mothers without GDM after adjustment for maternal BMI, pregnancy weight gain, family income, race and birthweight [OR = 1.61 (95%CI:1.07, 1.28)]. Our results indicate that maternal GDM status is associated with offspring overweight status during childhood. This relationship is only partially mediated by effects on birthweight. SN - 1573-6628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21327952/Gestational_diabetes_and_subsequent_growth_patterns_of_offspring:_the_National_Collaborative_Perinatal_Project_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-011-0756-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -