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Hepatitis C virus subtypes circulating among intravenous drug users in Lisbon, Portugal.
J Med Virol. 2011 Apr; 83(4):608-15.JM

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects 2-3% of the world population and intravenous drug consumption is the leading cause of transmission in industrialized countries. The unavailability of data on the molecular epidemiology of HCV infection in Portugal prompted the study of HCV subtypes circulating among intravenous drug users residing in the Lisbon metropolitan area and sampled about 10 years apart (1998-2000 and 2008-2009). Partial coding sequences for E1 and/or NS5B were obtained from 124 individuals with HCV viremia, both mono-infected and co-infected with HIV. Phylogenetic analysis showed that, for both time periods, the most prevalent subtypes were 1a and 3a, found, altogether, in 64.9% and 71.6% of the individuals, respectively for the first and the second sampling periods. However, genotype 4 viruses (subtypes 4a and 4d), introduced later, as inferred by comparison of intra-subtype genetic distances, were also relatively frequent even one decade ago (24.6%). This HCV subtype profile for Portuguese intravenous drug users is in agreement with those described for other southern European countries when in association with drug consumption. With the exception of subtype 1b, phylogenetic trees did not show clustering of the Portuguese sequences, but rather phylogenetic mixing of HCV sequences from different geographic origins, as described previously in other Western countries and suggestive of a large international transmission network. Consistent with the low recombination rates reported for HCV, only one sample revealed discordant subtypes for the two regions analyzed (4d in E1 and 4a in NS5B), representing a potential new recombinant that deserves further analysis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unidade de Virologia/Unidade de Parasitologia e Microbiologia Médicas, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (UNL), Lisboa, Portugal.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21328374

Citation

Calado, Rita Almeida, et al. "Hepatitis C Virus Subtypes Circulating Among Intravenous Drug Users in Lisbon, Portugal." Journal of Medical Virology, vol. 83, no. 4, 2011, pp. 608-15.
Calado RA, Rocha MR, Parreira R, et al. Hepatitis C virus subtypes circulating among intravenous drug users in Lisbon, Portugal. J Med Virol. 2011;83(4):608-15.
Calado, R. A., Rocha, M. R., Parreira, R., Piedade, J., Venenno, T., & Esteves, A. (2011). Hepatitis C virus subtypes circulating among intravenous drug users in Lisbon, Portugal. Journal of Medical Virology, 83(4), 608-15. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21955
Calado RA, et al. Hepatitis C Virus Subtypes Circulating Among Intravenous Drug Users in Lisbon, Portugal. J Med Virol. 2011;83(4):608-15. PubMed PMID: 21328374.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hepatitis C virus subtypes circulating among intravenous drug users in Lisbon, Portugal. AU - Calado,Rita Almeida, AU - Rocha,Maria Raquel, AU - Parreira,Ricardo, AU - Piedade,João, AU - Venenno,Teresa, AU - Esteves,Aida, PY - 2011/2/18/entrez PY - 2011/2/18/pubmed PY - 2011/5/24/medline SP - 608 EP - 15 JF - Journal of medical virology JO - J Med Virol VL - 83 IS - 4 N2 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects 2-3% of the world population and intravenous drug consumption is the leading cause of transmission in industrialized countries. The unavailability of data on the molecular epidemiology of HCV infection in Portugal prompted the study of HCV subtypes circulating among intravenous drug users residing in the Lisbon metropolitan area and sampled about 10 years apart (1998-2000 and 2008-2009). Partial coding sequences for E1 and/or NS5B were obtained from 124 individuals with HCV viremia, both mono-infected and co-infected with HIV. Phylogenetic analysis showed that, for both time periods, the most prevalent subtypes were 1a and 3a, found, altogether, in 64.9% and 71.6% of the individuals, respectively for the first and the second sampling periods. However, genotype 4 viruses (subtypes 4a and 4d), introduced later, as inferred by comparison of intra-subtype genetic distances, were also relatively frequent even one decade ago (24.6%). This HCV subtype profile for Portuguese intravenous drug users is in agreement with those described for other southern European countries when in association with drug consumption. With the exception of subtype 1b, phylogenetic trees did not show clustering of the Portuguese sequences, but rather phylogenetic mixing of HCV sequences from different geographic origins, as described previously in other Western countries and suggestive of a large international transmission network. Consistent with the low recombination rates reported for HCV, only one sample revealed discordant subtypes for the two regions analyzed (4d in E1 and 4a in NS5B), representing a potential new recombinant that deserves further analysis. SN - 1096-9071 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21328374/Hepatitis_C_virus_subtypes_circulating_among_intravenous_drug_users_in_Lisbon_Portugal_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21955 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -