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Evaluating eye drop instillation technique in glaucoma patients.
J Glaucoma 2012; 21(3):189-92JG

Abstract

AIM

To evaluate the technique of eye drop instillation in glaucoma patients.

METHODS

Seventy patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or primary angle-closure glaucoma, self-administering topical antiglaucoma medications for at least 6 months were evaluated. All patients instilled a tear substitute in 1 eye using the same technique they used for instilling antiglaucoma medications at home. The parameters that were recorded included time taken to instill the first drop, number of eye drops instilled, drop contact location, any contact with the tip of the bottle, and closure of the eyelids or tear duct after drop instillation.

RESULTS

The mean age of the patients was 54.1±10.0 years. The mean time taken to instill the first drop was 14.8±3.7 seconds (range, 8.7 to 23.5 s). The mean number of drops squeezed from the bottle per instillation was 1.8±1.2 drops (range, 1 to 8 drops). In 22 patients (31.43%), the eye drops fell on the eyelids or cheek. Fifty-three patients (75.7%) touched the tip of the bottle to the globe or periocular tissue. Twenty patients (28.57%) closed eyes after instilling drops and 4 patients (5.7%) occluded the punctum. Only 6 patients (8.57%) were able to correctly instill the eye drops (squeeze out 1 drop and instill it into the conjunctival sac without bottle tip contact).

CONCLUSIONS

Nearly, 9 of 10 glaucoma patients were unable to instill eye drops correctly. This may be an important cause of unintentional noncompliance in glaucoma medical therapy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Glaucoma Facility, Dr Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21336146

Citation

Gupta, Raghav, et al. "Evaluating Eye Drop Instillation Technique in Glaucoma Patients." Journal of Glaucoma, vol. 21, no. 3, 2012, pp. 189-92.
Gupta R, Patil B, Shah BM, et al. Evaluating eye drop instillation technique in glaucoma patients. J Glaucoma. 2012;21(3):189-92.
Gupta, R., Patil, B., Shah, B. M., Bali, S. J., Mishra, S. K., & Dada, T. (2012). Evaluating eye drop instillation technique in glaucoma patients. Journal of Glaucoma, 21(3), pp. 189-92. doi:10.1097/IJG.0b013e31820bd2e1.
Gupta R, et al. Evaluating Eye Drop Instillation Technique in Glaucoma Patients. J Glaucoma. 2012;21(3):189-92. PubMed PMID: 21336146.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluating eye drop instillation technique in glaucoma patients. AU - Gupta,Raghav, AU - Patil,Bharat, AU - Shah,Bhavin M, AU - Bali,Shveta Jindal, AU - Mishra,Sanjay K, AU - Dada,Tanuj, PY - 2011/2/22/entrez PY - 2011/2/22/pubmed PY - 2012/5/29/medline SP - 189 EP - 92 JF - Journal of glaucoma JO - J. Glaucoma VL - 21 IS - 3 N2 - AIM: To evaluate the technique of eye drop instillation in glaucoma patients. METHODS: Seventy patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or primary angle-closure glaucoma, self-administering topical antiglaucoma medications for at least 6 months were evaluated. All patients instilled a tear substitute in 1 eye using the same technique they used for instilling antiglaucoma medications at home. The parameters that were recorded included time taken to instill the first drop, number of eye drops instilled, drop contact location, any contact with the tip of the bottle, and closure of the eyelids or tear duct after drop instillation. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 54.1±10.0 years. The mean time taken to instill the first drop was 14.8±3.7 seconds (range, 8.7 to 23.5 s). The mean number of drops squeezed from the bottle per instillation was 1.8±1.2 drops (range, 1 to 8 drops). In 22 patients (31.43%), the eye drops fell on the eyelids or cheek. Fifty-three patients (75.7%) touched the tip of the bottle to the globe or periocular tissue. Twenty patients (28.57%) closed eyes after instilling drops and 4 patients (5.7%) occluded the punctum. Only 6 patients (8.57%) were able to correctly instill the eye drops (squeeze out 1 drop and instill it into the conjunctival sac without bottle tip contact). CONCLUSIONS: Nearly, 9 of 10 glaucoma patients were unable to instill eye drops correctly. This may be an important cause of unintentional noncompliance in glaucoma medical therapy. SN - 1536-481X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21336146/Evaluating_eye_drop_instillation_technique_in_glaucoma_patients_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=21336146 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -