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Levels of histamine and other biogenic amines in high-quality red wines.

Abstract

Biogenic amines in wine may impair sensory wine quality and cause adverse health effects in susceptible individuals. In this study, histamine and other biogenic amines were determined by HPLC after amine derivatisation to dansyl chloride conjugates in 100 selected high-quality red wines made from seven different cultivars. Amine levels varied considerably between different wines. The most abundant amines were putrescine (median = 19.4 mg l(-1), range = 2.9-122), histamine (7.2 mg l(-1), 0.5-26.9), and tyramine (3.5 mg l(-1), 1.1-10.7), whereas lower levels were found for isoamylamine (median = 0.25 mg l(-1)), phenylethylamine (0.16 mg l(-1)), cadaverine (0.58 mg l(-1)), spermidine (1.8 mg l(-1)) and tryptamine (0.06 mg l(-1)). Positive correlations were observed between isoamylamine and phenylethylamine, and between histamine, putrescine and tyramine levels. Amine concentrations were similar in all wine cultivars except Pinot noir and St. Laurent wines, which showed significantly higher tryptamine and cadaverine levels. The results indicate that levels of histamine and other biogenic amines may vary considerably between red wines independent of grape variety and that high amounts can also be found in high-rated wines. Adopting a legal histamine threshold level of 10 mg l(-1) in the European Union, as formerly introduced in other countries, would have excluded 34% of the investigated wines from the market.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    FAZ - Floridsdorf Allergy Centre, Franz Jonas Platz 8/6, A-1210 Vienna, Austria.

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    Source

    MeSH

    Analytic Sample Preparation Methods
    Biogenic Amines
    Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
    Dansyl Compounds
    Fluorescent Dyes
    Food Contamination
    Histamine
    Limit of Detection
    Putrescine
    Quality Control
    Reproducibility of Results
    Species Specificity
    Tyramine
    Wine

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21337238

    Citation

    Konakovsky, V, et al. "Levels of Histamine and Other Biogenic Amines in High-quality Red Wines." Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A, Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment, vol. 28, no. 4, 2011, pp. 408-16.
    Konakovsky V, Focke M, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, et al. Levels of histamine and other biogenic amines in high-quality red wines. Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011;28(4):408-16.
    Konakovsky, V., Focke, M., Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K., Schmid, R., Scheiner, O., Moser, P., ... Hemmer, W. (2011). Levels of histamine and other biogenic amines in high-quality red wines. Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A, Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment, 28(4), pp. 408-16. doi:10.1080/19440049.2010.551421.
    Konakovsky V, et al. Levels of Histamine and Other Biogenic Amines in High-quality Red Wines. Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011;28(4):408-16. PubMed PMID: 21337238.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Levels of histamine and other biogenic amines in high-quality red wines. AU - Konakovsky,V, AU - Focke,M, AU - Hoffmann-Sommergruber,K, AU - Schmid,R, AU - Scheiner,O, AU - Moser,P, AU - Jarisch,R, AU - Hemmer,W, Y1 - 2011/02/16/ PY - 2011/2/22/entrez PY - 2011/2/22/pubmed PY - 2011/7/20/medline SP - 408 EP - 16 JF - Food additives & contaminants. Part A, Chemistry, analysis, control, exposure & risk assessment JO - Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess VL - 28 IS - 4 N2 - Biogenic amines in wine may impair sensory wine quality and cause adverse health effects in susceptible individuals. In this study, histamine and other biogenic amines were determined by HPLC after amine derivatisation to dansyl chloride conjugates in 100 selected high-quality red wines made from seven different cultivars. Amine levels varied considerably between different wines. The most abundant amines were putrescine (median = 19.4 mg l(-1), range = 2.9-122), histamine (7.2 mg l(-1), 0.5-26.9), and tyramine (3.5 mg l(-1), 1.1-10.7), whereas lower levels were found for isoamylamine (median = 0.25 mg l(-1)), phenylethylamine (0.16 mg l(-1)), cadaverine (0.58 mg l(-1)), spermidine (1.8 mg l(-1)) and tryptamine (0.06 mg l(-1)). Positive correlations were observed between isoamylamine and phenylethylamine, and between histamine, putrescine and tyramine levels. Amine concentrations were similar in all wine cultivars except Pinot noir and St. Laurent wines, which showed significantly higher tryptamine and cadaverine levels. The results indicate that levels of histamine and other biogenic amines may vary considerably between red wines independent of grape variety and that high amounts can also be found in high-rated wines. Adopting a legal histamine threshold level of 10 mg l(-1) in the European Union, as formerly introduced in other countries, would have excluded 34% of the investigated wines from the market. SN - 1944-0057 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21337238/Levels_of_histamine_and_other_biogenic_amines_in_high_quality_red_wines_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19440049.2010.551421 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -