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Hyperhomocysteinemia decreases bone blood flow.
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2011 Jan 25; 7:31-5.VH

Abstract

Elevated plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy), known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), are associated with osteoporosis. A decrease in bone blood flow is a potential cause of compromised bone mechanical properties. Therefore, we hypothesized that HHcy decreases bone blood flow and biomechanical properties. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with Hcy (0.67 g/L) in drinking water for 8 weeks. Age-matched rats served as controls. At the end of the treatment period, the rats were anesthetized. Blood samples were collected from experimental or control rats. Biochemical turnover markers (body weight, Hcy, vitamin B(12), and folate) were measured. Systolic blood pressure was measured from the right carotid artery. Tibia blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flow probe. The results indicated that Hcy levels were significantly higher in the Hcy-treated group than in control rats, whereas vitamin B(12) levels were lower in the Hcy-treated group compared with control rats. There was no significant difference in folate concentration and blood pressure in Hcy-treated versus control rats. The tibial blood flow index of the control group was significantly higher (0.78 ± 0.09 flow unit) compared with the Hcy-treated group (0.51 ± 0.09). The tibial mass was 1.1 ± 0.1 g in the control group and 0.9 ± 0.1 in the Hcy-treated group. The tibia bone density was unchanged in Hcy-treated rats. These results suggest that Hcy causes a reduction in bone blood flow, which contributes to compromised bone biomechanical properties.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, KY, USA. n0tyag01@louisville.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21339911

Citation

Tyagi, Neetu, et al. "Hyperhomocysteinemia Decreases Bone Blood Flow." Vascular Health and Risk Management, vol. 7, 2011, pp. 31-5.
Tyagi N, Vacek TP, Fleming JT, et al. Hyperhomocysteinemia decreases bone blood flow. Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2011;7:31-5.
Tyagi, N., Vacek, T. P., Fleming, J. T., Vacek, J. C., & Tyagi, S. C. (2011). Hyperhomocysteinemia decreases bone blood flow. Vascular Health and Risk Management, 7, 31-5. https://doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S15844
Tyagi N, et al. Hyperhomocysteinemia Decreases Bone Blood Flow. Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2011 Jan 25;7:31-5. PubMed PMID: 21339911.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hyperhomocysteinemia decreases bone blood flow. AU - Tyagi,Neetu, AU - Vacek,Thomas P, AU - Fleming,John T, AU - Vacek,Jonathan C, AU - Tyagi,Suresh C, Y1 - 2011/01/25/ PY - 2011/2/23/entrez PY - 2011/2/23/pubmed PY - 2011/6/15/medline KW - bone density KW - homocysteine KW - tibia SP - 31 EP - 5 JF - Vascular health and risk management JO - Vasc Health Risk Manag VL - 7 N2 - Elevated plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy), known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), are associated with osteoporosis. A decrease in bone blood flow is a potential cause of compromised bone mechanical properties. Therefore, we hypothesized that HHcy decreases bone blood flow and biomechanical properties. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with Hcy (0.67 g/L) in drinking water for 8 weeks. Age-matched rats served as controls. At the end of the treatment period, the rats were anesthetized. Blood samples were collected from experimental or control rats. Biochemical turnover markers (body weight, Hcy, vitamin B(12), and folate) were measured. Systolic blood pressure was measured from the right carotid artery. Tibia blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flow probe. The results indicated that Hcy levels were significantly higher in the Hcy-treated group than in control rats, whereas vitamin B(12) levels were lower in the Hcy-treated group compared with control rats. There was no significant difference in folate concentration and blood pressure in Hcy-treated versus control rats. The tibial blood flow index of the control group was significantly higher (0.78 ± 0.09 flow unit) compared with the Hcy-treated group (0.51 ± 0.09). The tibial mass was 1.1 ± 0.1 g in the control group and 0.9 ± 0.1 in the Hcy-treated group. The tibia bone density was unchanged in Hcy-treated rats. These results suggest that Hcy causes a reduction in bone blood flow, which contributes to compromised bone biomechanical properties. SN - 1178-2048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21339911/Hyperhomocysteinemia_decreases_bone_blood_flow_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S15844 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -