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Predicting problematic Internet use in men and women: the contributions of psychological distress, coping style, and body esteem.
Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2011 Sep; 14(9):519-25.CB

Abstract

Problematic Internet use (PIU) is becoming a prevalent and serious problem among college students. Rates of PIU are higher in men, which may be due to psychological variables, such as comorbid psychological disorders and beliefs about one's body. We examined the ability of psychological distress, coping style, and body esteem to predict levels of PIU in men and women in a sample of 425 undergraduate students (46.8 percent male; mean age = 19.0, SD = 1.7). For men, phobic anxiety, wishful thinking, and overweight preoccupation were significant predictors of increased PIU. For women, depression, keeping to oneself, and decreased tension reduction were associated with increased PIU. The findings suggest that men and women may have different psychological reasons for excessive Internet use, including different types of psychological distress and coping styles. Unlike women, men may use the Internet because of weight concerns.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Western Illinois University, Macomb, Illinois 61455-1390, USA. md-hetzel@wiu.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21342011

Citation

Hetzel-Riggin, Melanie D., and Jacob R. Pritchard. "Predicting Problematic Internet Use in Men and Women: the Contributions of Psychological Distress, Coping Style, and Body Esteem." Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, vol. 14, no. 9, 2011, pp. 519-25.
Hetzel-Riggin MD, Pritchard JR. Predicting problematic Internet use in men and women: the contributions of psychological distress, coping style, and body esteem. Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2011;14(9):519-25.
Hetzel-Riggin, M. D., & Pritchard, J. R. (2011). Predicting problematic Internet use in men and women: the contributions of psychological distress, coping style, and body esteem. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 14(9), 519-25. https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2010.0314
Hetzel-Riggin MD, Pritchard JR. Predicting Problematic Internet Use in Men and Women: the Contributions of Psychological Distress, Coping Style, and Body Esteem. Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2011;14(9):519-25. PubMed PMID: 21342011.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predicting problematic Internet use in men and women: the contributions of psychological distress, coping style, and body esteem. AU - Hetzel-Riggin,Melanie D, AU - Pritchard,Jacob R, Y1 - 2011/02/22/ PY - 2011/2/24/entrez PY - 2011/2/24/pubmed PY - 2012/1/17/medline SP - 519 EP - 25 JF - Cyberpsychology, behavior and social networking JO - Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw VL - 14 IS - 9 N2 - Problematic Internet use (PIU) is becoming a prevalent and serious problem among college students. Rates of PIU are higher in men, which may be due to psychological variables, such as comorbid psychological disorders and beliefs about one's body. We examined the ability of psychological distress, coping style, and body esteem to predict levels of PIU in men and women in a sample of 425 undergraduate students (46.8 percent male; mean age = 19.0, SD = 1.7). For men, phobic anxiety, wishful thinking, and overweight preoccupation were significant predictors of increased PIU. For women, depression, keeping to oneself, and decreased tension reduction were associated with increased PIU. The findings suggest that men and women may have different psychological reasons for excessive Internet use, including different types of psychological distress and coping styles. Unlike women, men may use the Internet because of weight concerns. SN - 2152-2723 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21342011/Predicting_problematic_Internet_use_in_men_and_women:_the_contributions_of_psychological_distress_coping_style_and_body_esteem_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/cyber.2010.0314?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -