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Body mass index in midlife and late-life as a risk factor for dementia: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

Abstract

The relationship between body mass index (BMI) (in midlife and late-life) and dementia was investigated in meta-analyses of 16 articles reporting on 15 prospective studies. Follow-ups ranged from 3.2 to 36.0 years. Meta-analyses were conducted on samples including 25 624 participants evaluated for Alzheimer's disease (AD), 15 435 participants evaluated for vascular dementia (VaD) and 30 470 followed for any type of dementia (Any Dementia). Low BMI in midlife was associated with 1.96 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32, 2.92] times the risk of developing AD. The pooled relative risks for AD, VaD and Any Dementia for overweight BMI in midlife compared with normal BMI were 1.35 (95% CI:1.19, 1.54), 1.33 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.75) and 1.26 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.44), respectively. The pooled relative risks of AD and Any Dementia for obese BMI in midlife compared to normal BMI were 2.04 (95% CI: 1.59, 2.62) and 1.64 (95% CI: 1.34, 2.00), respectively. Continuous BMI in late-life was not associated with dementia. Small numbers of studies included in pooled analyses reduce generalizability of findings, and emphasize the need for publication of additional findings. We conclude that underweight, overweight and obesity in midlife increase dementia risk. Further research evaluating late-life BMI and dementia is required.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Ageing Research Unit, Centre for Mental Health Research Medical School, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia. kaarin.anstey@anu.edu.au

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Age Factors
    Alzheimer Disease
    Body Mass Index
    Comorbidity
    Dementia
    Dementia, Vascular
    Humans
    Obesity
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Thinness

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21348917

    Citation

    Anstey, K J., et al. "Body Mass Index in Midlife and Late-life as a Risk Factor for Dementia: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies." Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 12, no. 5, 2011, pp. e426-37.
    Anstey KJ, Cherbuin N, Budge M, et al. Body mass index in midlife and late-life as a risk factor for dementia: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Obes Rev. 2011;12(5):e426-37.
    Anstey, K. J., Cherbuin, N., Budge, M., & Young, J. (2011). Body mass index in midlife and late-life as a risk factor for dementia: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 12(5), pp. e426-37. doi:10.1111/j.1467-789X.2010.00825.x.
    Anstey KJ, et al. Body Mass Index in Midlife and Late-life as a Risk Factor for Dementia: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies. Obes Rev. 2011;12(5):e426-37. PubMed PMID: 21348917.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index in midlife and late-life as a risk factor for dementia: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. AU - Anstey,K J, AU - Cherbuin,N, AU - Budge,M, AU - Young,J, Y1 - 2011/02/23/ PY - 2011/2/26/entrez PY - 2011/2/26/pubmed PY - 2011/5/13/medline SP - e426 EP - 37 JF - Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity JO - Obes Rev VL - 12 IS - 5 N2 - The relationship between body mass index (BMI) (in midlife and late-life) and dementia was investigated in meta-analyses of 16 articles reporting on 15 prospective studies. Follow-ups ranged from 3.2 to 36.0 years. Meta-analyses were conducted on samples including 25 624 participants evaluated for Alzheimer's disease (AD), 15 435 participants evaluated for vascular dementia (VaD) and 30 470 followed for any type of dementia (Any Dementia). Low BMI in midlife was associated with 1.96 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32, 2.92] times the risk of developing AD. The pooled relative risks for AD, VaD and Any Dementia for overweight BMI in midlife compared with normal BMI were 1.35 (95% CI:1.19, 1.54), 1.33 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.75) and 1.26 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.44), respectively. The pooled relative risks of AD and Any Dementia for obese BMI in midlife compared to normal BMI were 2.04 (95% CI: 1.59, 2.62) and 1.64 (95% CI: 1.34, 2.00), respectively. Continuous BMI in late-life was not associated with dementia. Small numbers of studies included in pooled analyses reduce generalizability of findings, and emphasize the need for publication of additional findings. We conclude that underweight, overweight and obesity in midlife increase dementia risk. Further research evaluating late-life BMI and dementia is required. SN - 1467-789X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21348917/Body_mass_index_in_midlife_and_late_life_as_a_risk_factor_for_dementia:_a_meta_analysis_of_prospective_studies_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-789X.2010.00825.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -