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The role of the executive functions in school achievement at the end of Grade 1.
J Exp Child Psychol 2011; 109(2):158-73JE

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the role of executive functions (EFs) in early school achievement when a variety of potential confounding factors were controlled. Measures of EF (inhibition, flexibility, and working memory) and school readiness were administered to a sample of 85 kindergartners (39 boys and 46 girls, 5-6years old). School achievement was then assessed at the end of Grade 1. Results show math and reading/writing skills at the end of Grade 1 to be associated with kindergarten EFs. Only working memory contributed uniquely to the variance in school achievement after all covariates (preacademic abilities, affective variables, and family variables) were controlled and, even then, only with respect to math skills. On the other hand, working memory and inhibition had an indirect effect on reading/writing skills via anger-aggression. EF implication in school achievement is discussed in terms of task demands and child age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Quebec in Montreal (UQAM), Montreal, Quebec, Canada. sebastien_monette@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21349537

Citation

Monette, Sebastien, et al. "The Role of the Executive Functions in School Achievement at the End of Grade 1." Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, vol. 109, no. 2, 2011, pp. 158-73.
Monette S, Bigras M, Guay MC. The role of the executive functions in school achievement at the end of Grade 1. J Exp Child Psychol. 2011;109(2):158-73.
Monette, S., Bigras, M., & Guay, M. C. (2011). The role of the executive functions in school achievement at the end of Grade 1. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 109(2), pp. 158-73. doi:10.1016/j.jecp.2011.01.008.
Monette S, Bigras M, Guay MC. The Role of the Executive Functions in School Achievement at the End of Grade 1. J Exp Child Psychol. 2011;109(2):158-73. PubMed PMID: 21349537.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of the executive functions in school achievement at the end of Grade 1. AU - Monette,Sebastien, AU - Bigras,Marc, AU - Guay,Marie-Claude, Y1 - 2011/02/24/ PY - 2010/07/12/received PY - 2011/01/18/revised PY - 2011/01/20/accepted PY - 2011/2/26/entrez PY - 2011/2/26/pubmed PY - 2011/7/20/medline SP - 158 EP - 73 JF - Journal of experimental child psychology JO - J Exp Child Psychol VL - 109 IS - 2 N2 - The aim of this study was to determine the role of executive functions (EFs) in early school achievement when a variety of potential confounding factors were controlled. Measures of EF (inhibition, flexibility, and working memory) and school readiness were administered to a sample of 85 kindergartners (39 boys and 46 girls, 5-6years old). School achievement was then assessed at the end of Grade 1. Results show math and reading/writing skills at the end of Grade 1 to be associated with kindergarten EFs. Only working memory contributed uniquely to the variance in school achievement after all covariates (preacademic abilities, affective variables, and family variables) were controlled and, even then, only with respect to math skills. On the other hand, working memory and inhibition had an indirect effect on reading/writing skills via anger-aggression. EF implication in school achievement is discussed in terms of task demands and child age. SN - 1096-0457 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21349537/The_role_of_the_executive_functions_in_school_achievement_at_the_end_of_Grade_1_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-0965(11)00019-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -