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Dietary patterns and the risk of colorectal adenomas: the Black Women's Health Study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Colorectal adenomas are benign lesions that may be precursors to colorectal cancer. No studies of African American women have investigated dietary patterns and the risk of developing colorectal adenomas. We examined data from the Black Women's Health Study to determine whether dietary patterns are associated with the risk of developing colorectal adenomas.

METHODS

This is a prospective cohort study of 59,000 participants followed biennially since 1995. During 155,414 person-years of follow-up from 1997 to 2007 among women who had had at least one screening colonoscopy, 620 incident cases of colorectal adenomas were identified. By using Cox regression models, we obtained incidence rate ratios (IRR) for colorectal adenoma in relation to quintiles of each of two dietary patterns, adjusting for other colorectal adenoma risk factors.

RESULTS

Two dietary patterns, Western and prudent, were utilized to assess the association between dietary intake and adenoma risk. The highest quintile of prudent diet, relative to the lowest quintile, was significantly associated with 34% lower colorectal adenoma risk overall (IRR = 0.66; 95% CI, 0.50-0.88; P(trend) < 0.01). Higher scores on the Western pattern were associated with a higher risk of developing colorectal adenoma (IRR = 1.42; 95% CI, 1.09-1.85 for the highest quintile relative to the lowest; P(trend) = 0.01).

CONCLUSION

Our findings suggest that African American women may be able to reduce their risk of developing colorectal adenomas by following a prudent dietary pattern and avoiding a more Western pattern.

IMPACT

A dietary modification could have a strong impact in colorectal adenoma prevention in African American women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057, USA. khm33@georgetown.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21357379

Citation

Makambi, Kepher H., et al. "Dietary Patterns and the Risk of Colorectal Adenomas: the Black Women's Health Study." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 20, no. 5, 2011, pp. 818-25.
Makambi KH, Agurs-Collins T, Bright-Gbebry M, et al. Dietary patterns and the risk of colorectal adenomas: the Black Women's Health Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011;20(5):818-25.
Makambi, K. H., Agurs-Collins, T., Bright-Gbebry, M., Rosenberg, L., Palmer, J. R., & Adams-Campbell, L. L. (2011). Dietary patterns and the risk of colorectal adenomas: the Black Women's Health Study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 20(5), pp. 818-25. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-10-1213.
Makambi KH, et al. Dietary Patterns and the Risk of Colorectal Adenomas: the Black Women's Health Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011;20(5):818-25. PubMed PMID: 21357379.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary patterns and the risk of colorectal adenomas: the Black Women's Health Study. AU - Makambi,Kepher H, AU - Agurs-Collins,Tanya, AU - Bright-Gbebry,Mireille, AU - Rosenberg,Lynn, AU - Palmer,Julie R, AU - Adams-Campbell,Lucile L, Y1 - 2011/02/25/ PY - 2011/3/2/entrez PY - 2011/3/2/pubmed PY - 2011/9/16/medline SP - 818 EP - 25 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 20 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Colorectal adenomas are benign lesions that may be precursors to colorectal cancer. No studies of African American women have investigated dietary patterns and the risk of developing colorectal adenomas. We examined data from the Black Women's Health Study to determine whether dietary patterns are associated with the risk of developing colorectal adenomas. METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study of 59,000 participants followed biennially since 1995. During 155,414 person-years of follow-up from 1997 to 2007 among women who had had at least one screening colonoscopy, 620 incident cases of colorectal adenomas were identified. By using Cox regression models, we obtained incidence rate ratios (IRR) for colorectal adenoma in relation to quintiles of each of two dietary patterns, adjusting for other colorectal adenoma risk factors. RESULTS: Two dietary patterns, Western and prudent, were utilized to assess the association between dietary intake and adenoma risk. The highest quintile of prudent diet, relative to the lowest quintile, was significantly associated with 34% lower colorectal adenoma risk overall (IRR = 0.66; 95% CI, 0.50-0.88; P(trend) < 0.01). Higher scores on the Western pattern were associated with a higher risk of developing colorectal adenoma (IRR = 1.42; 95% CI, 1.09-1.85 for the highest quintile relative to the lowest; P(trend) = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that African American women may be able to reduce their risk of developing colorectal adenomas by following a prudent dietary pattern and avoiding a more Western pattern. IMPACT: A dietary modification could have a strong impact in colorectal adenoma prevention in African American women. SN - 1538-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21357379/Dietary_patterns_and_the_risk_of_colorectal_adenomas:_the_Black_Women's_Health_Study_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=21357379 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -