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Relative and attributable risk for cervical cancer: a comparative study in the United States and Italy.
Int J Epidemiol. 1990 Sep; 19(3):539-45.IJ

Abstract

The attributable risk for invasive cervical cancer in the US and Italian populations has been estimated in relation to main 'aetiological' factors (number of sexual partners, age at first intercourse, parity, oral contraceptive use and smoking) and history of Pap smear using data from two case-control studies conducted in the US (466 cases and 788 controls) and Italy (528 cases and 456 controls). The risk of cervical cancer increased in both studies with multiple sexual partners, decreasing age at first intercourse, higher parity, oral contraceptive use and smoking. Levels of exposure to various risk factors were markedly different in the two countries (ie number of sexual partners, frequency of oral contraceptive use and smoking were greater in the US). Multiple Pap smears and a short interval since last Pap smear strongly reduced risk of cervical cancer in both populations, although screening was much more widespread in the US study population, with only 9% of controls reporting no previous smear versus 38% of the Italian control series. The combined population attributable risk for the five 'aetiological' risk factors was slightly greater in the US study (76%) than in the Italian one (69%), chiefly because of a higher prevalence of exposure to sexual factors in US study women. A substantially larger proportion of Italian cases were due in part to deficiency in screening (46% in US and 84% in Italy). Thus, further inclusion of the effect of screening programmes (number of Pap smears and time since last Pap) led to an overall proportion of cases attributable to the examined risk factors of 87% in the US and 95% in Italy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2135870

Citation

Parazzini, F, et al. "Relative and Attributable Risk for Cervical Cancer: a Comparative Study in the United States and Italy." International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 19, no. 3, 1990, pp. 539-45.
Parazzini F, Hildesheim A, Ferraroni M, et al. Relative and attributable risk for cervical cancer: a comparative study in the United States and Italy. Int J Epidemiol. 1990;19(3):539-45.
Parazzini, F., Hildesheim, A., Ferraroni, M., La Vecchia, C., & Brinton, L. A. (1990). Relative and attributable risk for cervical cancer: a comparative study in the United States and Italy. International Journal of Epidemiology, 19(3), 539-45.
Parazzini F, et al. Relative and Attributable Risk for Cervical Cancer: a Comparative Study in the United States and Italy. Int J Epidemiol. 1990;19(3):539-45. PubMed PMID: 2135870.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relative and attributable risk for cervical cancer: a comparative study in the United States and Italy. AU - Parazzini,F, AU - Hildesheim,A, AU - Ferraroni,M, AU - La Vecchia,C, AU - Brinton,L A, PY - 1990/9/1/pubmed PY - 1990/9/1/medline PY - 1990/9/1/entrez KW - Age Distribution KW - Age Factors KW - Americas KW - Behavior KW - Biology KW - Cancer KW - Cervical Cancer--etiology KW - Comparative Studies KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Methods KW - Control Groups KW - Data Analysis KW - Data Collection KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developed Countries KW - Diseases KW - Europe KW - Evaluation KW - Examinations And Diagnoses KW - Family Planning KW - Fertility KW - Fertility Measurements KW - Italy KW - Laboratory Examinations And Diagnoses KW - Laboratory Procedures KW - Mediterranean Countries KW - Neoplasms KW - North America KW - Northern America KW - Oral Contraceptives KW - Parity KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Population Dynamics KW - Research Methodology KW - Risk Assessment KW - Risk Factors KW - Sex Behavior KW - Southern Europe KW - Studies KW - United States SP - 539 EP - 45 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - The attributable risk for invasive cervical cancer in the US and Italian populations has been estimated in relation to main 'aetiological' factors (number of sexual partners, age at first intercourse, parity, oral contraceptive use and smoking) and history of Pap smear using data from two case-control studies conducted in the US (466 cases and 788 controls) and Italy (528 cases and 456 controls). The risk of cervical cancer increased in both studies with multiple sexual partners, decreasing age at first intercourse, higher parity, oral contraceptive use and smoking. Levels of exposure to various risk factors were markedly different in the two countries (ie number of sexual partners, frequency of oral contraceptive use and smoking were greater in the US). Multiple Pap smears and a short interval since last Pap smear strongly reduced risk of cervical cancer in both populations, although screening was much more widespread in the US study population, with only 9% of controls reporting no previous smear versus 38% of the Italian control series. The combined population attributable risk for the five 'aetiological' risk factors was slightly greater in the US study (76%) than in the Italian one (69%), chiefly because of a higher prevalence of exposure to sexual factors in US study women. A substantially larger proportion of Italian cases were due in part to deficiency in screening (46% in US and 84% in Italy). Thus, further inclusion of the effect of screening programmes (number of Pap smears and time since last Pap) led to an overall proportion of cases attributable to the examined risk factors of 87% in the US and 95% in Italy. SN - 0300-5771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2135870/Relative_and_attributable_risk_for_cervical_cancer:_a_comparative_study_in_the_United_States_and_Italy_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ije/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ije/19.3.539 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -