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Growth rates of Florida corals from 1937 to 1996 and their response to climate change.
Nat Commun. 2011; 2:215.NC

Abstract

Ocean acidification causes declines in calcification rates of corals because of decreasing aragonite saturation states (Ω(arag)). Recent evidence also indicates that increasing sea surface temperatures may have already reduced growth and calcification rates because of the stenothermic threshold of localized coral populations. Density banding in coral skeletons provides a record of growth over the coral's lifespan. Here we present coral extension, bulk density and calcification master chronologies from seven subtropical corals (Montastraea faveolata) located in the Florida Keys, USA with a 60-year common period, 1937-1996. Linear trends indicate that extension increased, density decreased and calcification remained stable while the most recent decade was not significantly different than decadal averages over the preceding 50 years for extension and calcification. The results suggest that growth rates in this species of subtropical coral have been tolerant to recent climatic changes up to the time of collection (1996).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Oceanographic Center, National Coral Reef Institute, Nova Southeastern University, Dania Beach, Florida 33004, USA. kevinh@nova.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21364554

Citation

Helmle, Kevin P., et al. "Growth Rates of Florida Corals From 1937 to 1996 and Their Response to Climate Change." Nature Communications, vol. 2, 2011, p. 215.
Helmle KP, Dodge RE, Swart PK, et al. Growth rates of Florida corals from 1937 to 1996 and their response to climate change. Nat Commun. 2011;2:215.
Helmle, K. P., Dodge, R. E., Swart, P. K., Gledhill, D. K., & Eakin, C. M. (2011). Growth rates of Florida corals from 1937 to 1996 and their response to climate change. Nature Communications, 2, 215. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms1222
Helmle KP, et al. Growth Rates of Florida Corals From 1937 to 1996 and Their Response to Climate Change. Nat Commun. 2011;2:215. PubMed PMID: 21364554.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Growth rates of Florida corals from 1937 to 1996 and their response to climate change. AU - Helmle,Kevin P, AU - Dodge,Richard E, AU - Swart,Peter K, AU - Gledhill,Dwight K, AU - Eakin,C Mark, PY - 2010/08/26/received PY - 2011/02/02/accepted PY - 2011/3/3/entrez PY - 2011/3/3/pubmed PY - 2011/8/9/medline SP - 215 EP - 215 JF - Nature communications JO - Nat Commun VL - 2 N2 - Ocean acidification causes declines in calcification rates of corals because of decreasing aragonite saturation states (Ω(arag)). Recent evidence also indicates that increasing sea surface temperatures may have already reduced growth and calcification rates because of the stenothermic threshold of localized coral populations. Density banding in coral skeletons provides a record of growth over the coral's lifespan. Here we present coral extension, bulk density and calcification master chronologies from seven subtropical corals (Montastraea faveolata) located in the Florida Keys, USA with a 60-year common period, 1937-1996. Linear trends indicate that extension increased, density decreased and calcification remained stable while the most recent decade was not significantly different than decadal averages over the preceding 50 years for extension and calcification. The results suggest that growth rates in this species of subtropical coral have been tolerant to recent climatic changes up to the time of collection (1996). SN - 2041-1723 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21364554/Growth_rates_of_Florida_corals_from_1937_to_1996_and_their_response_to_climate_change_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms1222 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -