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Secondary transfer effects from imagined contact: group similarity affects the generalization gradient.
Br J Soc Psychol. 2011 Mar; 50(Pt 1):180-9.BJ

Abstract

An experiment examined the effects of imagining contact with an illegal immigrant on attitudes towards illegal immigrants and subsequent effects of that attitude change on feelings about other groups (secondary transfer). Compared to a condition in which participants imagined negative contact with an illegal immigrant, participants who imagined positive contact reported more positive attitudes concerning illegal immigrants. Using bootstrapped mediation models, effects of positive imagined contact on attitudes towards illegal immigrants were shown to generalize to other groups that were independently ranked as similar to illegal immigrants, but not to dissimilar groups. This generalization gradient effect was relatively large. Implications for theory and practical applications to prejudice reduction are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Arizona, Tucson, USA. jharwood@u.arizona.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21366619

Citation

Harwood, Jake, et al. "Secondary Transfer Effects From Imagined Contact: Group Similarity Affects the Generalization Gradient." The British Journal of Social Psychology, vol. 50, no. Pt 1, 2011, pp. 180-9.
Harwood J, Paolini S, Joyce N, et al. Secondary transfer effects from imagined contact: group similarity affects the generalization gradient. Br J Soc Psychol. 2011;50(Pt 1):180-9.
Harwood, J., Paolini, S., Joyce, N., Rubin, M., & Arroyo, A. (2011). Secondary transfer effects from imagined contact: group similarity affects the generalization gradient. The British Journal of Social Psychology, 50(Pt 1), 180-9. https://doi.org/10.1348/014466610X524263
Harwood J, et al. Secondary Transfer Effects From Imagined Contact: Group Similarity Affects the Generalization Gradient. Br J Soc Psychol. 2011;50(Pt 1):180-9. PubMed PMID: 21366619.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Secondary transfer effects from imagined contact: group similarity affects the generalization gradient. AU - Harwood,Jake, AU - Paolini,Stefania, AU - Joyce,Nick, AU - Rubin,Mark, AU - Arroyo,Analisa, PY - 2011/3/4/entrez PY - 2011/3/4/pubmed PY - 2011/5/18/medline SP - 180 EP - 9 JF - The British journal of social psychology JO - Br J Soc Psychol VL - 50 IS - Pt 1 N2 - An experiment examined the effects of imagining contact with an illegal immigrant on attitudes towards illegal immigrants and subsequent effects of that attitude change on feelings about other groups (secondary transfer). Compared to a condition in which participants imagined negative contact with an illegal immigrant, participants who imagined positive contact reported more positive attitudes concerning illegal immigrants. Using bootstrapped mediation models, effects of positive imagined contact on attitudes towards illegal immigrants were shown to generalize to other groups that were independently ranked as similar to illegal immigrants, but not to dissimilar groups. This generalization gradient effect was relatively large. Implications for theory and practical applications to prejudice reduction are discussed. SN - 0144-6665 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21366619/Secondary_transfer_effects_from_imagined_contact:_group_similarity_affects_the_generalization_gradient_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1348/014466610X524263 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -