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Use of ibuprofen and risk of Parkinson disease.
Neurology. 2011 Mar 08; 76(10):863-9.Neur

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Neuroinflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) in general, and possibly ibuprofen in particular, has been shown to be related to lower PD risk in previous epidemiologic studies.

METHODS

We prospectively examined whether use of ibuprofen or other NSAIDs is associated with lower PD risk among 136,197 participants in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) free of PD at baseline (1998 for NHS and 2000 for HPFS). NSAIDs use was assessed via questionnaire. Results were combined in a meta-analysis with those of published prospective investigations.

RESULTS

We identified 291 incident PD cases during 6 years of follow-up. Users of ibuprofen had a significantly lower PD risk than nonusers (relative risk [RR], adjusted for age, smoking, caffeine, and other covariates = 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.42-0.93; p = 0.02). There was a dose-response relationship between tablets of ibuprofen taken per week and PD risk (p trend = 0.01). In contrast, PD risk was not significantly related to use of aspirin (RR = 0.99; 95% CI 0.78-1.26), other NSAIDs (RR = 1.26; 95% CI 0.86-1.84), or acetaminophen (RR = 0.86; 95% CI 0.62-1.18). Similar results were obtained in the meta-analyses: the pooled RR was 0.73 (95% CI 0.63-0.85; p < 0.0001) for ibuprofen use, whereas use of other types of analgesics was not associated with lower PD risk.

CONCLUSIONS

The association between use of ibuprofen and lower PD risks, not shared by other NSAIDs or acetaminophen, suggests ibuprofen should be further investigated as a potential neuroprotective agent against PD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02115, USA. xiang.gao@channing.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21368281

Citation

Gao, Xiang, et al. "Use of Ibuprofen and Risk of Parkinson Disease." Neurology, vol. 76, no. 10, 2011, pp. 863-9.
Gao X, Chen H, Schwarzschild MA, et al. Use of ibuprofen and risk of Parkinson disease. Neurology. 2011;76(10):863-9.
Gao, X., Chen, H., Schwarzschild, M. A., & Ascherio, A. (2011). Use of ibuprofen and risk of Parkinson disease. Neurology, 76(10), 863-9. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e31820f2d79
Gao X, et al. Use of Ibuprofen and Risk of Parkinson Disease. Neurology. 2011 Mar 8;76(10):863-9. PubMed PMID: 21368281.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Use of ibuprofen and risk of Parkinson disease. AU - Gao,Xiang, AU - Chen,Honglei, AU - Schwarzschild,Michael A, AU - Ascherio,Alberto, Y1 - 2011/03/02/ PY - 2011/3/4/entrez PY - 2011/3/4/pubmed PY - 2011/5/7/medline SP - 863 EP - 9 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 76 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Neuroinflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) in general, and possibly ibuprofen in particular, has been shown to be related to lower PD risk in previous epidemiologic studies. METHODS: We prospectively examined whether use of ibuprofen or other NSAIDs is associated with lower PD risk among 136,197 participants in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) free of PD at baseline (1998 for NHS and 2000 for HPFS). NSAIDs use was assessed via questionnaire. Results were combined in a meta-analysis with those of published prospective investigations. RESULTS: We identified 291 incident PD cases during 6 years of follow-up. Users of ibuprofen had a significantly lower PD risk than nonusers (relative risk [RR], adjusted for age, smoking, caffeine, and other covariates = 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.42-0.93; p = 0.02). There was a dose-response relationship between tablets of ibuprofen taken per week and PD risk (p trend = 0.01). In contrast, PD risk was not significantly related to use of aspirin (RR = 0.99; 95% CI 0.78-1.26), other NSAIDs (RR = 1.26; 95% CI 0.86-1.84), or acetaminophen (RR = 0.86; 95% CI 0.62-1.18). Similar results were obtained in the meta-analyses: the pooled RR was 0.73 (95% CI 0.63-0.85; p < 0.0001) for ibuprofen use, whereas use of other types of analgesics was not associated with lower PD risk. CONCLUSIONS: The association between use of ibuprofen and lower PD risks, not shared by other NSAIDs or acetaminophen, suggests ibuprofen should be further investigated as a potential neuroprotective agent against PD. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21368281/Use_of_ibuprofen_and_risk_of_Parkinson_disease_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=21368281 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -