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Changes in oropharyngeal airway and respiratory function during sleep after orthognathic surgery in patients with mandibular prognathism.
Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2011 Jun; 40(6):584-92.IJ

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of mandibular setback surgery on pharyngeal airway space and respiratory function during sleep. The subjects were 22 patients in whom mandibular prognathism was corrected by bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy; either one jaw or two jaw surgery. Polysomnography was performed before surgery and 6 months after surgery, and the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) and arterial oxygen saturation during sleep were measured to assess respiratory function during sleep. Morphological changes were studied using cephalograms taken immediately before, a few days after and 6 months after surgery. As a control, 10 subjects without sleep-disordered breathing underwent the same examinations. AHI was not changed significantly after surgery, although two patients were diagnosed with mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome after surgery. They were not obese, but the amounts of mandibular setback at surgery were large. In conclusion, a large amount of mandibular setback might inhibit biological adaption and cause sleep-disordered breathing, and it might be better to consider maxillary advance or another technique that does not reduce the airway for patients with skeletal class III malocclusions who have large anteroposterior discrepancy and/or maxillary hypoplasia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Reconstructive Surgery for Oral and Maxillofacial Region, Department of Tissue Regeneration and Reconstruction, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata, Japan. hasebe@dent.niigat-u.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21371862

Citation

Hasebe, D, et al. "Changes in Oropharyngeal Airway and Respiratory Function During Sleep After Orthognathic Surgery in Patients With Mandibular Prognathism." International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, vol. 40, no. 6, 2011, pp. 584-92.
Hasebe D, Kobayashi T, Hasegawa M, et al. Changes in oropharyngeal airway and respiratory function during sleep after orthognathic surgery in patients with mandibular prognathism. Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2011;40(6):584-92.
Hasebe, D., Kobayashi, T., Hasegawa, M., Iwamoto, T., Kato, K., Izumi, N., Takata, Y., & Saito, C. (2011). Changes in oropharyngeal airway and respiratory function during sleep after orthognathic surgery in patients with mandibular prognathism. International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 40(6), 584-92. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijom.2011.01.011
Hasebe D, et al. Changes in Oropharyngeal Airway and Respiratory Function During Sleep After Orthognathic Surgery in Patients With Mandibular Prognathism. Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2011;40(6):584-92. PubMed PMID: 21371862.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Changes in oropharyngeal airway and respiratory function during sleep after orthognathic surgery in patients with mandibular prognathism. AU - Hasebe,D, AU - Kobayashi,T, AU - Hasegawa,M, AU - Iwamoto,T, AU - Kato,K, AU - Izumi,N, AU - Takata,Y, AU - Saito,C, Y1 - 2011/03/02/ PY - 2009/07/16/received PY - 2010/12/15/revised PY - 2011/01/12/accepted PY - 2011/3/5/entrez PY - 2011/3/5/pubmed PY - 2011/9/29/medline SP - 584 EP - 92 JF - International journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery JO - Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg VL - 40 IS - 6 N2 - The aim of this study was to examine the effects of mandibular setback surgery on pharyngeal airway space and respiratory function during sleep. The subjects were 22 patients in whom mandibular prognathism was corrected by bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy; either one jaw or two jaw surgery. Polysomnography was performed before surgery and 6 months after surgery, and the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) and arterial oxygen saturation during sleep were measured to assess respiratory function during sleep. Morphological changes were studied using cephalograms taken immediately before, a few days after and 6 months after surgery. As a control, 10 subjects without sleep-disordered breathing underwent the same examinations. AHI was not changed significantly after surgery, although two patients were diagnosed with mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome after surgery. They were not obese, but the amounts of mandibular setback at surgery were large. In conclusion, a large amount of mandibular setback might inhibit biological adaption and cause sleep-disordered breathing, and it might be better to consider maxillary advance or another technique that does not reduce the airway for patients with skeletal class III malocclusions who have large anteroposterior discrepancy and/or maxillary hypoplasia. SN - 1399-0020 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21371862/Changes_in_oropharyngeal_airway_and_respiratory_function_during_sleep_after_orthognathic_surgery_in_patients_with_mandibular_prognathism_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0901-5027(11)00035-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -