Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The impact on the workload of the Ward Manager with the introduction of administrative assistants.
J Nurs Manag. 2011 Mar; 19(2):177-85.JN

Abstract

AIM

To evaluate the impact on the workload of the Ward Manager (WM) with the introduction of administrative assistants into eight trusts in the South of England in a year-long pilot.

BACKGROUND

Ward Managers are nurse leaders who are responsible for ward management and delivering expert clinical care to patients. They have traditionally been expected to achieve this role without administrative assistance. Meeting the workload demands of multiple roles and overload has meant the leadership and clinical role has suffered, presenting issues of low morale among existing WMs and issues of recruiting the next generation of WMs.

METHOD

Sixty qualitative interviews were carried out with 16 WMs, 12 Ward Manager Assistants (WMAs), and six senior nurse executives about the impact of the introduction of the WMA post. Quantitative data to measure change in WM workload and ward activity was supplied by 24 wards.

RESULTS

Ward Managers reported spending reduced time on administrative tasks and having increased time available to spend on the ward with patients and leading staff. With the introduction of WMAs, there was also improvement in key performance measures (the maintenance of quality under service pressures) and increased staff motivation.

CONCLUSIONS

There was overwhelming support for the introduction of administrative assistants from participating WMs. The WMAs enabled WMs to spend more time with patients and, more widely, to provide greater support to ward teams. The success of the pilot is reflected in wards working hard to be able to extend contracts of WMAs. The extent of the success is reflected in wards that were not participants in the pilot, observing the benefits of the post, having worked to secure funding to recruit their own WMAs.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT

The widespread introduction of administrative assistance could increase ward productivity and provide support for clinical leaders. Continuing professional development for WMs needs to incorporate training about management responsibilities and how to best use administrative support.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Education, Health and Social Care, The University of Winchester, Winchester, UK. rachel.locke@winchester.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21375620

Citation

Locke, Rachel, et al. "The Impact On the Workload of the Ward Manager With the Introduction of Administrative Assistants." Journal of Nursing Management, vol. 19, no. 2, 2011, pp. 177-85.
Locke R, Leach C, Kitsell F, et al. The impact on the workload of the Ward Manager with the introduction of administrative assistants. J Nurs Manag. 2011;19(2):177-85.
Locke, R., Leach, C., Kitsell, F., & Griffith, J. (2011). The impact on the workload of the Ward Manager with the introduction of administrative assistants. Journal of Nursing Management, 19(2), 177-85. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2834.2011.01229.x
Locke R, et al. The Impact On the Workload of the Ward Manager With the Introduction of Administrative Assistants. J Nurs Manag. 2011;19(2):177-85. PubMed PMID: 21375620.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The impact on the workload of the Ward Manager with the introduction of administrative assistants. AU - Locke,Rachel, AU - Leach,Camilla, AU - Kitsell,Fleur, AU - Griffith,Jacki, PY - 2011/3/8/entrez PY - 2011/3/8/pubmed PY - 2011/7/16/medline SP - 177 EP - 85 JF - Journal of nursing management JO - J Nurs Manag VL - 19 IS - 2 N2 - AIM: To evaluate the impact on the workload of the Ward Manager (WM) with the introduction of administrative assistants into eight trusts in the South of England in a year-long pilot. BACKGROUND: Ward Managers are nurse leaders who are responsible for ward management and delivering expert clinical care to patients. They have traditionally been expected to achieve this role without administrative assistance. Meeting the workload demands of multiple roles and overload has meant the leadership and clinical role has suffered, presenting issues of low morale among existing WMs and issues of recruiting the next generation of WMs. METHOD: Sixty qualitative interviews were carried out with 16 WMs, 12 Ward Manager Assistants (WMAs), and six senior nurse executives about the impact of the introduction of the WMA post. Quantitative data to measure change in WM workload and ward activity was supplied by 24 wards. RESULTS: Ward Managers reported spending reduced time on administrative tasks and having increased time available to spend on the ward with patients and leading staff. With the introduction of WMAs, there was also improvement in key performance measures (the maintenance of quality under service pressures) and increased staff motivation. CONCLUSIONS: There was overwhelming support for the introduction of administrative assistants from participating WMs. The WMAs enabled WMs to spend more time with patients and, more widely, to provide greater support to ward teams. The success of the pilot is reflected in wards working hard to be able to extend contracts of WMAs. The extent of the success is reflected in wards that were not participants in the pilot, observing the benefits of the post, having worked to secure funding to recruit their own WMAs. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The widespread introduction of administrative assistance could increase ward productivity and provide support for clinical leaders. Continuing professional development for WMs needs to incorporate training about management responsibilities and how to best use administrative support. SN - 1365-2834 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21375620/The_impact_on_the_workload_of_the_Ward_Manager_with_the_introduction_of_administrative_assistants_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2834.2011.01229.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -