Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: increasing incidence, decreasing surgery rate, and compromised nutritional status: A prospective population-based cohort study 2007-2009.
Inflamm Bowel Dis 2011; 17(12):2541-50IB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The aim was to evaluate the incidence, treatment, surgery rate, and anthropometry at diagnosis of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

METHODS

Patients diagnosed between January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2009 in Eastern Denmark, Funen, and Aarhus were included from a background population of 668,056 children <15 years of age. For evaluation of incidence, treatment, and surgery rate, a subcohort from Eastern Denmark was extracted for comparison with a previously published population-based cohort from the same geographical area (1998-2006).

RESULTS

In all, 130 children with IBD: 65 with Crohn's disease (CD), 62 with ulcerative colitis (UC), and three with IBD unclassified (IBDU) were included. The mean incidence rates per 10(6) in 2007-2009 were: IBD: 6.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.4-7.7), CD: 3.2 (2.5-4.1), UC: 3.1 (2.4-4.0) and IBDU: 0.2 (0.05-0.5). Comparing the two cohorts from Eastern Denmark we found higher incidence rates for IBD (5.0 and 7.2 in 1998-2000 and 2007-2009, respectively, P = 0.02) and CD (2.3 versus 3.3, P = 0.04). Furthermore, we found a significant decrease in surgery rates (15.8/100 person-years versus 4.2, P = 0.02) and an increase in the rate of initiating immunomodulators (IM) within the first year (29.0/100 person-years versus 69.2, P < 0.001). IM use was associated with a trend towards a decreased surgery risk (relative risk [RR] 0.38; 0.15-1.0). Children with CD had poor nutritional status at diagnosis compared with the general pediatric population.

CONCLUSIONS

Over the past 12 years we found an increase in the incidence of IBD in children, an increasing use of IM, and decreasing 1-year surgery rates. CD patients had poor nutritional status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Hvidovre University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. Christian.jakobsen@hvh.regionh.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21381152

Citation

Jakobsen, Christian, et al. "Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Increasing Incidence, Decreasing Surgery Rate, and Compromised Nutritional Status: a Prospective Population-based Cohort Study 2007-2009." Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, vol. 17, no. 12, 2011, pp. 2541-50.
Jakobsen C, Paerregaard A, Munkholm P, et al. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: increasing incidence, decreasing surgery rate, and compromised nutritional status: A prospective population-based cohort study 2007-2009. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2011;17(12):2541-50.
Jakobsen, C., Paerregaard, A., Munkholm, P., Faerk, J., Lange, A., Andersen, J., ... Wewer, V. (2011). Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: increasing incidence, decreasing surgery rate, and compromised nutritional status: A prospective population-based cohort study 2007-2009. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, 17(12), pp. 2541-50. doi:10.1002/ibd.21654.
Jakobsen C, et al. Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Increasing Incidence, Decreasing Surgery Rate, and Compromised Nutritional Status: a Prospective Population-based Cohort Study 2007-2009. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2011;17(12):2541-50. PubMed PMID: 21381152.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: increasing incidence, decreasing surgery rate, and compromised nutritional status: A prospective population-based cohort study 2007-2009. AU - Jakobsen,Christian, AU - Paerregaard,Anders, AU - Munkholm,Pia, AU - Faerk,Jan, AU - Lange,Aksel, AU - Andersen,Jesper, AU - Jakobsen,Marianne, AU - Kramer,Iza, AU - Czernia-Mazurkiewicz,Janina, AU - Wewer,Vibeke, Y1 - 2011/03/04/ PY - 2010/12/13/received PY - 2010/12/23/accepted PY - 2011/3/8/entrez PY - 2011/3/8/pubmed PY - 2012/5/17/medline SP - 2541 EP - 50 JF - Inflammatory bowel diseases JO - Inflamm. Bowel Dis. VL - 17 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: The aim was to evaluate the incidence, treatment, surgery rate, and anthropometry at diagnosis of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: Patients diagnosed between January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2009 in Eastern Denmark, Funen, and Aarhus were included from a background population of 668,056 children <15 years of age. For evaluation of incidence, treatment, and surgery rate, a subcohort from Eastern Denmark was extracted for comparison with a previously published population-based cohort from the same geographical area (1998-2006). RESULTS: In all, 130 children with IBD: 65 with Crohn's disease (CD), 62 with ulcerative colitis (UC), and three with IBD unclassified (IBDU) were included. The mean incidence rates per 10(6) in 2007-2009 were: IBD: 6.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.4-7.7), CD: 3.2 (2.5-4.1), UC: 3.1 (2.4-4.0) and IBDU: 0.2 (0.05-0.5). Comparing the two cohorts from Eastern Denmark we found higher incidence rates for IBD (5.0 and 7.2 in 1998-2000 and 2007-2009, respectively, P = 0.02) and CD (2.3 versus 3.3, P = 0.04). Furthermore, we found a significant decrease in surgery rates (15.8/100 person-years versus 4.2, P = 0.02) and an increase in the rate of initiating immunomodulators (IM) within the first year (29.0/100 person-years versus 69.2, P < 0.001). IM use was associated with a trend towards a decreased surgery risk (relative risk [RR] 0.38; 0.15-1.0). Children with CD had poor nutritional status at diagnosis compared with the general pediatric population. CONCLUSIONS: Over the past 12 years we found an increase in the incidence of IBD in children, an increasing use of IM, and decreasing 1-year surgery rates. CD patients had poor nutritional status. SN - 1536-4844 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21381152/Pediatric_inflammatory_bowel_disease:_increasing_incidence_decreasing_surgery_rate_and_compromised_nutritional_status:_A_prospective_population_based_cohort_study_2007_2009_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=21381152 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -